Arizona Trail Day 9 – Grand Canyon Inner Canyon Part III (Vermillion Cliffs/AZT Day 16, AZT Passage 38)

Took a rare opportunity to sleep in a bit this morning. I’m familiar with the hike out from Phantom Ranch to the South Rim, even along the steeper South Kaibab Trail, so I’m relatively confident in even getting a slower start and still making it out by early evening. (Note – If I had not spent 6 months working here and accustomed to hiking here, I would not do this, so for those of you who may be considering hiking at Grand Canyon, please allow yourself plenty of time to hike out to the South Rim – ideally twice the amount of time that it took you to reach the bottom if you start from the South Rim, or about the same amount of time it took you to reach Phantom from the North Rim.). I get some breakfast at Phantom Ranch, the famous lodging within the Canyon designed by Mary Colter for the Fred Harvey Company and built at the bottom of Bright Angel Canyon just up from its junction with the Colorado River. Originally named Roosevelt Camp, Colter had the name changed to Phantom Ranch. All building materials other than rock (a prominent one, unsurprisingly) had to be hauled down by mule. Today, it is one of only two places in the United States where mail is still mailed by mule (and the cancellation stamps at the canteen proudly say so).

Around 11, I’m hiking out. The South Kaibab Trail turns east along the Colorado River from the mouth of Bright Angel Creek and passes Bright Angel Pueblo. The pueblo is 900-1000 years old, and was visited by John Wesley Powell’s 1869 Colorado River expedition, the first successful non-native attempt to raft the entire Grand Canyon.

From the Pueblo, the trail reaches the Kaibab Bridge, or Black Bridge, over the Colorado River. A 440 ft suspension bridge, it is the crossing for all mule trips from the South Rim to Phantom Ranch, and along with the Silver Bridge downstream (visible from the Kaibab Bridge) it is one of only two crossings between the Navajo Bridge at Lee’s Ferry and Hoover Dam. The construction materials for the bridge were carried down the newly constructed South Kaibab Trail in 1928, with 42 Havasupai tribesmen carrying each 1 ton, 550 ft suspension cables down the trail. The materials weighed 122 tons in total. It is a major civil engineering landmark.

Visible from the Kaibab Bridge are the Silver Bridge downstream, which the Bright Angel Trail uses to cross the river, as well as the cableway next to the bridge. The Black Bridge is the fourth crossing of the Colorado at the location. The first was a ferry, but this was extremely perilous. The second was the cableway, a 6×10 ft steel cage to carry passengers (mules and people) across the river. Theodore Roosevelt used it on a 1913 visit to then-Grand Canyon National Monument. A successor suspension bridge opened in 1920, to be succeeded by the Kaibab Bridge in 1928.

The river itself, unlike when I departed from Lee’s Ferry, is a deep brown today due to rain upstream. At such times, the river takes on its natural brown color, which in fact was what led to its name – “Rio Colorado,” meaning “colored river” or “red river” in Spanish. It’s refreshing to see it as it was seen for all of history before the construction of Glen Canyon Dam in the 1960s.

In stark contrast to the North Rim at around 8800 ft, the Colorado at Phantom is only around 2500 ft, or around the same elevation as Phoenix, so the weather it experiences is more akin to Central Arizona valleys than it is the rims of the Canyon. A hike through Grand Canyon crosses between 5-8 ecosystems, depending of where the precise boundaries are drawn, and can be like hiking from Mexico to Canada from an ecological perspective. Below the rim, one passes through the riparian zone along the river, the Lower Sonoran Desert, Upper Sonoran Desert. The North Rim features ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests, and the South Rim ponderosa pine and pinyon-juniper forest.

Passing through a brief tunnel on the south bank, the trail quickly ascends around 1500 ft to The Tipoff on the edge of the Tonto Platform, the rim of the Inner Canyon. During this climb, I am treated to some great views of river trips launching again after having lunch at Phantom Ranch. The trail crosses the Tonto Platform and begins to climb toward Skeleton Point, through sections of the South Kaibab with colorful names such as the “Red & Whites,” and with outstanding views of the formations and scale of the canyon.

And then everything changes.

I came around a corner below Skeleton Point, just below the Red & Whites to find someone sitting in the middle of the trail. Upon my asking if they were OK, they said no, they thought they had broken their ankle. When I asked why they thought that, they said that “I tried to stand up, and it just flops to the side.” Yes, that’s a break. I say that I can splint it, but other than that we’d have to get more help down to get her out. But I ask if they want me to use my new inReach to contact GRCA SAR and get it, which they accept. I hit the SOS button on my inReach, and a hiker behind me helps splint it using their poles and cord that I carried while I ran to Tipoff to call GRCA SAR directly. Unfortunately it was too windy for a helicopter medivac at that time, so we had to wait about 2-3 hours for a medic to reach us on the trail. We got a firm splint on the ankle and lucked out – eventually they did get a helicopter window and managed to land and take the individual down a slope to where they had landed. Ended up hiking out with the husband of the individual in question; we topped around around 9-10. I have to say, given the wind we experienced on the upper South Kaibab, I’m shocked the helicopter managed to reach us at all. The backup plan was apparently to have them spend the night near Tipoff and launch in the morning.

So glad that I opted to carry an inReach for this trip, now. I didn’t expect it to pay off so soon, but, of course, that is the nature of an emergency.

The Kaibab Bridge from the South Kaibab Trail near Bright Angel Pueblo, Grand Canyon National Park
Bright Angel Pueblo, Grand Canyon National Park
The Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park
Downstream view from the north side of the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River. The Boat Beach and Bright Angel Creek delta are visible in the center of the image. Walls of black Vishnu Schist with pink Zoroaster granite intrusions rise over 1000 ft above the river.
Downstream view from the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River. The Boat Beach and Bright Angel Creek delta are visible in the center of the image. Walls of black Vishnu Schist with pink Zoroaster granite intrusions rise over 1000 ft above the river.
Downstream view from the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River. The Boat Beach and Bright Angel Creek delta are visible in the center of the image. Walls of black Vishnu Schist with pink Zoroaster granite intrusions rise over 1000 ft above the river.
Upstream view from the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, showing the cableway system that predated the bridge.
View across the Kaibab Bridge to the south side of the river, Grand Canyon National Park
Downstream view of the Inner Canyon including the Colorado River and Bright Angel Creek delta, Grand Canyon National Park. The Silver Bridge is visible downstream.
View of the Kaibab Bridge from the South Kaibab Trail climbing out of the Inner Gorge, Grand Canyon National Park
River trip launching on the Colorado River from the Boat Beach on the Bright Angel Creek Delta near Phantom Ranch, Grand Canyon National Park
River trip launching on the Colorado River from the Boat Beach on the Bright Angel Creek Delta near Phantom Ranch, Grand Canyon National Park
Downstream view of the Colorado River, Inner Gorge, Bright Angel Creek delta, Bright Angel Campground, Phantom Ranch, and the Silver Bridge over the Colorado. Grand Canyon National Park.
Zoroaster Temple (the sawtooth ridge) peeks above the lip of the Inner Gorge from the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
River trip continuing downstream on the Colorado River in the Inner Gorge, as viewed from Tipoff on the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
Zoroaster Temple viewed from Tipoff on the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
Grand Canyon’s formations on the north side of the Inner Gorge around Bright Angel Canyon, as viewed from Tipoff on the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park. In the Inner Gorge, the Silver and Black Bridges can be seen, along with the mouth of Bright Angel Canyon and the creek delta, and Phantom Ranch. Formations such as Zoroaster’s Temple tower above.
North panorama centered on Zoroaster’s Temple from the South Kaibab Trail crossing the Tonto Platform, Grand Canyon National Park
Zoroaster Temple from the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
Departure of the medevac that I assisted with.

Arizona Day 15 (AZT Day 8), Grand Canyon National Park Inner Canyon Part II (Passage 38)

It’s getting dark when I rejoin the trail, so I’ll supplement this stretch with some photos from May. The trail enters the Box for the final several miles to Bright Angel Campground. This narrow section of the canyon is carved out of the Vishnu Schist, some of the oldest rock visible in the world (about 1.8 billion years old). The trail is stuck between Bright Angel Creek and the wall of the canyon, criss-crossing the creek to whichever side affords slightly more room. During the day in the summer, the black schist absorbs and radiates heat from the sun. Official temperature readings at Phantom Ranch are taken in the shade, and can reach 120-130ºF (50ºC+). Temperatures can climb significantly higher in the sun and when accounting for the radiant heat contributed by the rocks; it’s also not uncommon to reach radiant temperatures over 140ºF in the Inner Canyon, including the Box. Overnight temperatures rarely drop below 70 degrees in the summer. Last summer, people’s shoes quite literally melted on the rocks and rangers successfully cooked eggs on them. It’s like a geologic convection oven, a miniature Death Valley. Please do not attempt hiking in the Inner Canyon during the hours of 10-4 from May-September.

Bright Angel Canyon is the widest portion of Grand Canyon, stretching 18 miles between the North Rim, where it separates the developed area from the Walhalla Plateau and Cape Royal, and the South Rim at Grand Canyon Village. Like many side canyons in the Grand Canyon complex, it is formed along a fault line. Faults leads to cracks in the rocks and allow water to more easily erode them in those areas.

Reaching Bright Angel Campground, I set up shop at the stock site as assigned and stretch out on one of the picnic tables. Time to get some good rest for the night to prepare for the hike out tomorrow. I have some friends planning a bit of a welcoming event for me when I reach the South Rim.

(Note: I will supplement this entry with photos that I took on the same trail hiking Rim-to-Rim-to-Rim (R3) back in May.)

View toward the South Rim from North Kaibab Trail in Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Yavapai Point in center of image.
North Kaibab Trail in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. A pole from the transcanyon telephone line installed by the Civilian Conservation Corps can be seen on the right.
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
Phantom Canyon joining with The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Phantom Canyon was so named because it was found in the canyon, but cannot be seen from the South Rim, disappearing like a “phantom.”
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
Transcanyon Telephone Line and North Kaibab Trail in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
North Kaibab Trail along Bright Angel Creek in The Box section of Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park

Arizona Trail Passage 38, Grand Canyon Inner Canyon (Day 15, AZT Day 8)

Grabbed a few things at the general store on the North Rim of Grand Canyon today, then packed up camp. The park has a number of special sites at the campground, available first-come, first-served, to those who hike or bike into the park. I then proceed over to the Backcountry Information Center, and get put on another thruhiker’s permit for Bright Angel Campground at the bottom, near the Colorado River. My pack weighs in at 46 pounds, not overly light but lighter than it has been. Obviously some of my efforts to cut weight before crossing the canyon paid off. After a side trip to see the aspens in Thompson Canyon, as recommended by the LE ranger that I spoke to yesterday, I head into the canyon.

This is the only part of the Arizona Trail that I have solid familiarity with, having hiked from the South Rim to the North Rim and back in May. If there’s anything I know, it’s to expect the unexpected. In May I ran into rain, hail, and snow between Cottonwood and the North Rim as elevations changed. I was also delayed heading back to the South Rim the following day by several hours due to a torrential rainstorm that blew through. Fortunately, none of that materializes today. It’s still going to be warm at the bottom, but not as warm as it would have been had I started right when my season ended, and the warmth is a welcome change from the Kaibab cold of the past few nights. The trail starts 8297 ft of elevation and drops to the Colorado River at 2480 ft.

The route heads down the legendary North Kaibab Trail, past the Coconino Overlook, where I have a long conversation with a park PSAR volunteer hoping to do the trail themselves in the spring, to the Supai Tunnel, around which the grade peaks at 25%, one of the steepest on the entire AZT. Fortunately, I’m going down. By this point, I have descended through the Kaibab Limestone, Toroweap Formation, Coconino Sandstone, and into the Supai Group.

The trail continues to descend. It enters the Redwall Limestone and drops through a series of switchbacks to the Redwall Bridge before beginning a more gradual traverse through the layer, a stretch where the trail was literally blasted out of the cliff, almost forming a half-tunnel. The trail continues through the Muav Limestone to Roaring Springs at the border with the Bright Angel Shale, the source of all of the drinking water for Grand Canyon National Park. The water from the springs is pumped to the North Rim and flows by gravity to Indian Gardens on the South Rim before being pumped to the rim itself from there. Entering Bright Angel Canyon, it crosses Bright Angel Creek at Manzanita Rest Area and proceeds to Cottonwood Campground, where I stayed in May hiking to and from the North Rim, partially in preparation for this hike.

Onward to Ribbon Falls. It’s nearing sunset when I get there, and the bridge has been out since the spring due to someone jumping on it. But I find a way to ford the creek and reach the lower falls and see them up close. I’ll have to return to get a better view and also hike to the two upper segments of the falls.

Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Coconino Overlook. Komo Point at junction of Roaring Springs and Bright Angel Canyons. South Rim can be seen in right-center, with San Francisco Peaks above. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Coconino Overlook. Komo Point at junction of Roaring Springs and Bright Angel Canyons. South Rim can be seen in right-center, with San Francisco Peaks above. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim layering above the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38. Kaibab Formation at top, sloping Toroweap, Coconino Cliffs, and sloping Hermit Shale lead down to the Supai Group.
View through the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible in shade, lower right of image.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible in shade, lower right of image.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible on lower right-center of image in shade.
View back toward Supai Tunnel from North Kaibab Trail descending into Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from north side of Redwall Bridge, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Redwall Bridge, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.
North Rim from North Kaibab Trail in Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
Upcanyon view of Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Redwall Bridge in lower center. NK Trailhead is located in pine forest on upper left.
Upcanyon view of Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Redwall Bridge in lower center. NK Trailhead is located in pine forest on upper left.
View down & across Roaring Springs Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Uncle Jim Point at upper left. Rim in distance is in Bright Angel Canyon.
North Kaibab Trail in Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. This section of trail, one of the most rugged and remote on the developed Corridor between the North and South Rims, was blown out of the cliff by the CCC in the 1930s.
Komo Point on the North Rim rises above the junction of Roaring Springs Canyon and Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, AZT Passage 38.
Roaring Springs, viewed from the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Bright Angel Creek from the North Kaibab Trail in upper Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Bright Angel Creek from the North Kaibab Trail in upper Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Cascade waterfall on Bright Angel Creek from the North Kaibab Trail in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View toward the junction of Bright Angel Canyon (center) and Roaring Springs Canyon (left). Komo Point to right; Uncle Jim Point on upper left. View from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Bright Angel Canyon, North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Remnant transcanyon telephone line built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression. North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim in Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim in Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim in Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Crescent moon above rim of Bright Angel Canyon, North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38
Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Yes, there is still water in the desert.
Ribbon Falls, Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Ribbon Falls, Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38

Day 14, Part II: Passage 39 – Grand Canyon National Park North Rim

The North Rim lookout is located near the highest point on the entire Arizona Trail. A historical geographic marker still bearing the Forest Service name (the tower was moved to its current location inside the park in the 1930s) is beside the tower, along with a historic lookout register sign. This particular tower is also notable for a particularly famous lookout – Edward Abbey once staffed it for four years from the late 60s into the 70s. The historic guide to using the “FireFinder” system is still present in the room at the top of the lookout.

North Rim Lookout geographic marker
FireFinder instruction guide, originally from Six Rivers National Forest
Osbourne FireFinder system

Climbing to the top of the lookout, one can see the Ikes Fire actively burning to the west. Through the haze, the shadow of Mt Trumbull and other peaks in Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument can be seen.

West view from North Rim Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

To the south lies the San Francisco volcanic field, topped by the majestic San Francisco Peaks rising above. I’ll go into it in more detail as I approach them, but for now I’ll note that were it not for the canyon, the Peaks would be the most famous geological feature in Arizona. Humphreys Peak, the highest point, stands at 12,633 feet. The Arizona Trail will reach and wrap directly around their flank on the journey south. The city of Flagstaff lies immediately beyond, at the foot of the mountain on the south side. Through the trees one can make out the rim of the canyon, but the dominant view in the foreground is the aspen foliage mixed with spruce/fir and ponderosa forest. Grand Canyon National Park fills the foreground with aspen foliage mixed with spruce/fir and ponderosa forest. Heading back down the road, I head west on the AZT to the park entrance.

San Francisco Volcanic Field from the North Rim Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon National Park. From left to right, O’Leary Peak, the San Francisco Peaks (Humphreys Peak highest), Kendrick Peak, and Red Mountain
East-South view from North Rim Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Aspen meadow below the North Rim Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon National Park
South/Southwest view from North Rim Lookout Tower, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The trail descends down the old road that led to the fire lookout until it reaches AZ-67 at the North Rim Entrance Station.

Aspens along Lookout Road east of the North Rim Entrance Station, Grand Canyon National Park

I check in with the ranger there, who asks if I need anything, but I’m good for now. After some slight confusion about the route leaving that area, I pick up the trail again (purist that I am, after retracing some steps, admittedly) and follow it south. It almost directly parallels the road, rolling through the hills beside, then crosses it and follows an old utility corridor down the west side past Thompson Canyon to the Widforss Trailhead.

Aspens on Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Aspens tunnels on Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Aspens on Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Aspens on Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Aspens on Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail looking toward Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail on Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail on Lindbergh Hill, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, east side of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, west side of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Squirrel in conifer tree, possibly a Kaibab squirrel. Hard to see from this angle whether it has tufted ears or not.
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail south of AZ-67 crossing, Grand Canyon National Park

When I reach the trailhead, I notice that the Widforss Trail is blocked off, which is strange since we had been informed that area was still open and accessible despite the Ikes Fire to the west. An LE ranger* approaches me and asks if I’m a thruhiker, and I say yes, that I came from just outside the park. He asks if I saw anything unusual on the trail, and signs of a fire or anything. Apparently someone on the Widforss trail somehow managed to set their tent on fire. How that happened, I can only imagine, but apparently they managed to do it. I mention that I worked on the South Rim and we talk for a while before I press on to the campground, where I encounter Eric and the two thruhikers, Roger and his friend, who I met at the North Rim Country Store yesterday. We talk for a while and then head to the lodge to get something to eat. I’m interested in eating at the restaurant, but it’s going to be a bit of a wait, so I grab some pizza and a beer with them and sit out on the fantastic patio area the lodge has overlooking the canyon.

Aspens in Harvey Meadow, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail north of the North Kaibab Trailhead, Grand Canyon National Park
Grand Canyon at sunset, south view from Transept Trail toward San Francisco Peaks from Grand Canyon Lodge, Grand Canyon National Park
Moon over Grand Canyon at sunset, south view toward San Francisco Peaks from Grand Canyon Lodge, Grand Canyon National Park
Grand Canyon at sunset, south view toward San Francisco Peaks from Grand Canyon Lodge, Grand Canyon National Park

I should say, the North Rim Lodge (or Grand Canyon Lodge, as it is officially known, is my favorite lodge so far in the park system. It blends seamlessly with the natural beauty around it, having been constructed of native stone. It has some of the best food I’ve had at any lodge – superior to that on the South Rim for sure. And it is perched directly on the rim of the canyon, so you can just sit on the patio, grab a drink and soak in the view – which stretches farther than the South Rim vista due to the higher elevation of the Kaibab and the North Rim.

And sitting out there with a couple other thruhikers, talking about our plans for the next day, how we are going to get across the canyon, permits and logistics, and plans for the days beyond, as the sun set over the canyon, is just incredible.

Ultimately, I do get a spot at the restaurant as well. The hostess recognizes my name. Apparently she has been told about me through a mutual friend on the South Rim. She’s also a seasonal ranger; her season just ended at Glen Canyon. She gives me her boyfriend as my waiter, and we talk about hiking, the Arizona Trail, and other long distance trails (I’m already considering the Long Trail) throughout dinner. Shortly thereafter, I experience my second bit of “trail magic” – he shows up at the end of the meal and tells me not to worry about the bill, “I took care of it.” Guess he appreciated me and the conversation I provided. Back to sleep before trying to get a permit for Bright Angel tomorrow to cross the canyon.

Day 14: Kaibab Plateau South (Passage 40) to Grand Canyon North Rim (Passage 39), Part I

Another cold morning. There are icicles in my water and some food has frozen. I’m on the trail around 7:30. I’m in the vicinity of the highest point on the entire Arizona Trail. Setting out, the trail winds through meadows and past more aspen groves mixed with spruce/fir forest and crosses the unmarked highpoint just before reaching the Grand Canyon National Park boundary. Passing a boundary sign similar to the one encountered at Lee’s Ferry two weeks ago when I first set out, the AZT passes through another extensive aspen meadow and eventually a trail branches off leading to the historic North Rim fire lookout.

Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40, Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park
Arizona Trail, Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim, Grand Canyon National Park

Day 13: Kaibab Plateau South (Passage 40)

I’m on the trail early. As I noted in an earlier entry, one of the perils of combining being a seasonal ranger and thruhiking in the offseason (or shoulder seasons) is that one must make oneself available for interviews in sometimes inconvenient times or places. I owe a park a return call at some point today. Based on the tip I received from a nobo hiker yesterday, I hope to have service at the East Rim Overlook about 2 miles south of my campsite last night. When I get to the overlook – a beautiful spot with a bench and picnic table overlooking a portion of the eastern canyon, with additional trails leading out to further views – I find I do indeed have service. I spread my solar panel out and hook up my batteries to charge given the open sky view here and charging opportunity, and make the call.

After doing my interview and taking care of some other business, I’m headed south again. Continuing south, the trail passes through more aspen groves, rice meadows, and mixed conifer forest, the latter increasingly spruce-fir as the rolling Kaibab slowly rises in elevation. Each displays the forest in a different stage – the rice meadows, areas most recently disturbed by something, be it a fire, severe wind, etc; the aspens, one of the pioneer trees to move in thereafter; and the spruce-fir/mixed conifer forest, the least recently disturbed.

It’s been a rough last few days with the wind and overnight temps, so upon reaching Crystal Spring I take a detour to Meadows Edge and the North Rim Country Store through some USFS roads and more aspen groves that continue to shine, meeting Roger and another thruhiking friend and discuss strategy and escape from the wind for a period. I then return to the trail and put some more miles in. Another 18 or so mile day in total, although not as many of those were on the actual trail as I might like (a fair number were getting to and from the North Rim Country Store). Still, I’m fairly close to the border between the Kaibab National Forest and Grand Canyon National Park.

Regardless, I should be at the North Rim tomorrow (about 15 miles away), Phantom on Thursday, SR on Friday, and on the trail to Flagstaff perhaps on Tuesday.

Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) beside rice grass meadows on the Arizon\a Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
The Arizona Trail exits a rice grass meadow and reenters stands of aspens in fall colors among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors stand among mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Arizona Trail distance marker at East Rim Overlook, Kaibab National Forest, Arizona. 59 miles to Utah, 743 to Mexico.
East Rim Overlook view. The view looks over House Rock Valley, Marble Canyon (the youngest portion of Grand Canyon), and the Navajo Reservation. Navajo Mountain, in Utah, looms in the distance.
East Rim Overlook view. The view looks over House Rock Valley, Marble Canyon (the youngest portion of Grand Canyon), and the Navajo Reservation. Navajo Mountain, in Utah, looms in the distance.
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (spruce, fir, ponderosa pine) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (primarily spruce/fir here) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers (primarily spruce/fir here) on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens beside rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens amid mixed conifers and rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens amid mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens amid mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens and mixed conifers in rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens amid rice grass meadows on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens amid rice grass and mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens in fall colors amid rice grass and mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers on the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Lichen – a symbiotic, or mutually beneficial, relationship between algae and fungus – is a great indicator of air quality. Here on the Kaibab, it practically sprouts from trees and branches as its own plant, the air is so clear. Kaibab National Forest, Arizona.
Aspens among rice grass and mixed conifers on the Arizona Trail in the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona

Day 12, Part III: Kaibab Plateau South

Toward the end of the day there is a second encounter with another thruhiker, this time with Eric, the hiker that I encountered several days ago when he was headed northbound (nobo) to Utah; he’s now headed southbound (sobo). Hiking together for a stretch, Eric and I come to a golden tree tunnel of aspens where the trail bends away from the road, then descend into Upper Tater Canyon. He’s moving faster so he presses on. It’s nearing sunset, but I can feel the breeze start to pick up and come up the valley. I have no desire to repeat last night, so exhausted as I am, I push through an extra few miles to reach cover. The trail crosses Upper Tater and ascends a ridge on the east side as it heads toward the east rim of the Kaibab Plateau. I spot a relatively flat camp spot beside the trail with some trees that can act as a wind fence and call it a day after about 17-18 miles just shy of the East Rim overlook where I hope to have service for my interview.

Relive video, Part III
Arizona Trail descending into Pleasant Valley, Kaibab Plateau South (Passage 40), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Panoramic aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Panoramic aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Panoramic aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage among mixed conifers along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage among mixed conifers along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Golden tunnel of aspens along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspens along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspens along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Golden tunnel of aspens along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Golden aspens along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Panoramic aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage among mixed conifers along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen foliage along the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Evening in Upper Tater Canyon on the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Evening in Upper Tater Canyon on the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Evening in Upper Tater Canyon on the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Evening in Upper Tater Canyon on the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspen grove in Upper Tater Canyon on the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Evening in Upper Tater Canyon on the Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspens and mixed conifer lining the Arizona Trail climbing out of Upper Tater Canyon on Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Aspens and mixed conifer lining the Arizona Trail climbing out of Upper Tater Canyon on Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South), Kaibab National Forest
Day 12 route