Coronavirus and National Parks: All COVID-19 Impacts and Park Reopenings

Updated 6/13

Another period of big updates across the National Park System. Parks that changed status recently include Grand Canyon National Park, Sequoia National Park, Kings Canyon National Park, Yosemite National Park, Big Bend National Park, Glacier National Park, and more. See below for details, highlighted in italics. Dates next to a state or site indicate the most recent date that state or site was fully updated. A site may have been updated more recently than a whole state, so be sure to check individual sites.

Parks that have publicly said they are planning changes include Glacier National Park, Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve, Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Big Bend National Park.

Please note any additional travel restrictions placed by states or localities on visitation before going to a park, and follow all guidance, as reopenings are reliant on responsible visitation. Always remember to #RecreateResponsibly!

First things first, there are updates for the George Washington Memorial Parkway (see below). There is no update for Arlington House, which remains closed due to renovations. It will remain closed until the fall, in all likelihood. We continue to implement a phased reopening plan on the Parkway as Northern Virginia enters Phase 2 of the state-organized reopening. Details on the status for both sites can be found under Virginia below.

Big Slackwater, C&O Canal National Historical Park

FULLY CLOSED

  • Alabama (7/28)
    • Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument – Birmingham Civil Rights Institute closed indefinitely
    • Selma to Montgomery NHT – Closed/Cerrado
    • Tuskegee Airmen NHS – Closed/Cerrado
    • Tuskegee Institute NHS – Closed/Cerrado
  • Alaska
    • Alaska Public Lands Information Centers – Closed/Cerrado
  • Arizona (7/28)
    • Canyon de Chelly NM – Closed; Navajo Nation has prohibited visitation
    • Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Navajo National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
  • Arkansas
    • President William Jefferson Clinton Birthplace Home National Historic Site
      • Home is closed to tours; Visitor Center is open from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm
  • California
    • Eugene O’Neill National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Fort Point National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • John Muir National Historic Site
      • Open
        • Orchard
        • Picnic area
        • Mount Wanda
      • Closed
        • Visitor center
        • Muir home
        • Martinez adobe
    • Muir Woods National Monument – Open
    • Port Chicago Naval Magazine National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado
    • Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Colorado
    • Great Sand Dunes National Park – Closed/Cerrado
      • Phased reopening begins 6/3
      • Open
        • Park
        • Loops 1 & 2 of campground
        • Backpacking
      • Closed
        • Visitor Center
        • South Ramada group picnic site in the Mosca Creek Picnic Area
        • Pinon Flats Campground Group Loop
    • Great Sand Dunes National Preserve – Open
    • Hovenweep National Monument
      • Roads, trails, restrooms open
      • Visitor center, campground closed until further notice
  • Connecticut
    • Weir Farm National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
      • Park Grounds and Parking Lot are open daily from 7am-5pm.
      • All facilities, including restrooms, remain closed and no water is available. 
  • Florida
    • De Soto National Memorial
      • parking lot and nature trails are open
      • Visitor Center and restroom facilities remain closed
      • El estacionamiento y los senderos de De Soto National Memorial están abiertos
      • El centro de visitantes y las instalaciones del baño permanecen cerrados
    • Fort Caroline National Memorial – Closed/Parque Cerrado
    • Fort Matanzas National Monument – Closed/ Parque Cerrado
    • Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve – Closed/Parque Cerrado
    • Canaveral National Seashore – Closed/ Parque Cerrado
    • Castillo de San Marcos National Monument – Closed/Parque Cerrado
    • Fort Frederica National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
  • Georgia
    • Jimmy Carter National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Guam
    • War in the Pacific National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Hawaii
    • Kalaupapa National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado (6/22)
    • Pearl Harbor National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado (6/22)
  • Illinois
    • Lincoln Home National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
  • Louisiana
    • Cane River Creole National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Maryland
    • Clara Barton National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Fort Foote & Fort Washington Parks – Closed/Cerrado
    • Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine – Closed/Cerrado
    • Greenbelt Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Massachusetts
    • Adams National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Boston African American National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area – Closed/Cerrado
    • Boston National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Lowell National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Salem Maritime National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Springfield Armory National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
  • Michigan
    • Isle Royale National Park
      • Visitor center closed indefinitely, reevaluated daily
      • Island closed indefinitely
    • River Raisin National Battlefield Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Mississippi
    • Natchez National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Missouri
    • Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
  • Montana
    • Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
  • New Jersey
    • Thomas Edison National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • New Mexico
    • El Morro National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • Fort Union National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • White Sands National Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • New York
    • African Burial Ground National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • Castle Clinton National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Federal Hall National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado
    • Fort Stanwix National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • General Grant National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado
    • Hamilton Grange National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado
    • Harriet Tubman National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Martin Van Buren National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Saint Paul’s Church National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Statue of Liberty National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • Stonewall National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Women’s Rights National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • North Carolina
    • Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
  • Ohio
    • Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
    • First Ladies National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial – Seasonal closure
      • Visitor Center and Ranger Programs delayed opening until June 13th
      • Memorial and Observation Platform closed indefinitely due to size and space limitations
    • William Howard Taft National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
  • Pennsylvania
    • Edgar Allan Poe National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Eisenhower National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Independence National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Steamtown National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Thaddeus Kosciuszko National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado
  • Puerto Rico
    • San Juan National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
  • Rhode Island
    • Roger Williams National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado
  • South Carolina
    • Charles Pinckney National Historic Site – Closed/Cerrado
    • Congaree National Park
      • Closed/Cerrado
    • Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
  • Texas
    • Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument – Visitor Center Closed; tours are required to visit and are suspended
    • Chamizal National Memorial – Closed/Cerrado
    • Guadalupe Mountains National Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park – Closed/Cerrado
    • Rio Grande Wild and Scenic River – Closed/Cerrado
    • Waco Mammoth National Monument – Closed/Cerrado
  • Virginia
    • Appomattox Court House National Historical Park – Closed
    • Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial – Building is closed for restoration & installation of all-new exhibits. Reopening will be pushed back indefinitely. Arlington National Cemetery is also closed indefinitely, is managed separately by the Department of Defense as a military base, and one must pass through the cemetery to access the house.
    • Booker T. Washington National Monument – Closed
    • George Washington Birthplace National Monument – Closed
    • Maggie L. Walker National Historic Site – Closed
  • Washington
    • Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve – Closed
    • Fort Vancouver National Historic Site – Closed
  • Washington, DC
    • Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument – Closed
    • Carter G Woodson Home National Historic Site – Closed
    • Ford’s Theatre National Historic Site – Closed
    • Frederick Douglass National Historic Site – Closed
    • Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site – Closed
    • Washington Monument – Closed
Advertisements
Advertisements

PARTIALLY CLOSED

  • Alabama (7/28)
    • Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument – Birmingham Civil Rights Institute closed indefinitely
    • Horseshoe Bend NMP –
      • Tour road open
      • Trails open
      • Boat launch open
      • Closed
        • Visitor Center
        • Restrooms
        • Picnic area
    • Russell Cave NM – No drinking water available
    • Little River Canyon National Preserve
      • Visitor Center & Restrooms Closed
      • Canyon Mouth Park closed
    • Natchez Trace Parkway – Visitor Center & Contact Stations Closed
  • Alaska
    • Bering Land Bridge National Preserve – facility cleaning & maintenance limited this summer. Headquarters operations increasing. (6/22)
    • Cape Krusenstern National Monument
      • Northwest Arctic Heritage Center closed
    • Gates of the Arctic National Park
      • Air travel access to park and contact at visitor centers may be limited
    • Gates of the Arctic National Preserve
      • Air travel access to park may be limited
    • Glacier Bay National Park
      • All facilities closed
      • Visitor services closed until 7/1 (backcountry permit season will start 5/1)
      • Yakutat Ranger Station Closed
      • Bartlett Cove Public Use Dock access limited
      • Bartlett Cove campground and warming hut closed
      • Advance notice permits now 14 days
    • Kenai Fjords National Park
      • All public buildings closed, including Park Headquarters and the Exit Glacier public use cabin and vault toilets
    • Kobuk Valley National Park
      • Northwest Arctic Heritage Center Closed
    • Noatak National Preserve
      • Northwest Artic Heritage Center Closed
    • Denali National Park
      • Visitor Centers Closed
      • 2020 Climbing Season Suspended for Denali and Mt Foraker
      • Campgrounds closed
    • Katmai National Park
      • Brooks Camp closed until 7/1
    • Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (Alaska Unit) – All park facilities closed
    • Lake Clark National Park
      • Park Headquarters closed to public until further notice; call 907-781-2218 for assistance
      • Richard Proennke Historic Site & Hope Creek Campsite Closed
        • Richard Proennke Historic Cabin and all areas within 1/2 mile, including historic administration cabins, Hope Creek campsite and all outdoor areas are closed indefinitely
      • Public use cabins closed
    • Kenai Fjords National Park
      • All public buildings closed, including Park Headquarters and the Exit Glacier public use cabin and vault toilets
    • Kobuk Valley National Park
      • Northwest Arctic Heritage Center Closed
    • Wrangell-St Elias National Park
      • Park Headquarters closed to public indefinitely; for information call 907-822-5234
      • Public announcement detailing procedures for federal subsistence permits for upcoming fishing and hunting seasons will be released by 5/1
      • Interpretive programs, in-person trip planning, in-person backcountry information, bear canister loans, and restrooms at the following are delayed indefinitely until at least 7/1
        • Slana Visitor Center
        • Copper Center Visitor Center
        • Chitina Ranger Station
        • Kennecott Visitor Center
      • Within the Kennecott Mill National Historic Landmark, the following changes have been implemented
        • All buildings administered by NPS are closed
        • Kendesnii Campground is closed
        • The following public use cabins are closed
          • Esker Stream
          • Caribou Creek
          • Viking Lodge
          • Nugget Creek
      • Camping in the KNHL is closed
        • The following trails within the KNHL are closed
          • Erie Mine Trail
          • Root Glacier Trail
          • Bonanza Mine Trail
          • Jumbo Mine Trail
    • Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve
      • Visitors be aware that air travel access to the park and contact with information centers may be limited. Travel restrictions may exist as businesses close or greatly reduce operations to non-essential travel. Make contact before making travel plans.
  • American Samoa
    • National Park of American Samoa – Visitor Center closed. Travel restrictions in place (14 days in HI + health clearance 3 days before entry to American Samoa)
  • Arizona (7/28)
    • Casa Grande Ruins National Monument
      • Great House & Ruins open
      • Closed
        • Visitor Center
        • Theatre
        • Exhibits
        • Bookstore
    • Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
      • ACCESS IS BEST VIA US-89 SOUTH FROM UTAH. The Navajo Nation has banned visitors from entering the reservation; crossing the reservation via tribal land on US-89 from the south or US-163 is strongly discouraged without contacting the tribe first.
      • Closed
        • Downlake
          • Antelope Point Public launch ramp (est open 7/29)
          • All Overnight Camping along Beehive/Ferry Swale Road Network
          • Park Headquarters
          • Carl Hayden Visitor Center and Glen Canyon Dam tours
      • Uplake
        • Bullfrog Visitor Center
        • Escalante Interagency Visitor Center
        • Hite Fish Cleaning Station
      • Lee’s Ferry
        • Lee’s Ferry Campground
        • Navajo Bridge Interpretive Center
          • All programs and permits suspended
    • Currently Open
      • Park
        • Downlake
          • Antelope Point Marina (all services except boat tours and Grandma Bettys)
          • Antelope Point Business Launch Ramp (marina customers only)
          • Antelope Point Entrance Station
          • Wahweap South, Wahweap North, Lone Rock Entrance Stations. Card transactions only
          • Lone Rock Beach – day use and primitive camping
          • Wahweap Main Ramp open 7 days a week. Aquatic Invasive Species staff will be present on these ramps from sunup to sundown, local time
          • Wahweap Stateline Ramp open 7 days a week. Aquatic Invasive Species staff will be present on these ramps from sunup to sundown, local time
          • Wahweap RV Park & Campground (including laundry and shower facilities) and campground store are open
          • Wahweap Picnic Area restrooms
          • Wahweap Overlook
          • Fuel docks, boat pumpouts, floating restrooms, and all fish cleaning stations (except Hite)
          • Beehive Campground is open, limit 3 days (camping beyond campground closed)
          • Horseshoe Bend Overlook
        • Uplake
          • Halls Crossing Ramp reopens for day use (8-6 PM). AIS staff will be present
        • Lee’s Ferry
          • Lee’s Ferry launch ramp & restroom
        • Lakewide
          • Lake Powell public launch ramps at Bullfrog and Wahweap open 7 days/week, 24 hours/day. AIS staff will be present dawn to dusk
          • Campgrounds
            • Bullfrog
            • Halls Crossing
            • Hite
            • Stanton Creek
            • Farley Canyon
            • North Wash
          • Dangling Rope restrooms open full time
          • Primitive campgrounds open for overnight use
            • Stanton Creek (located near Bullfrog)
        • Day Use Areas open
          • Wahweap Overlook (Page, AZ)
          • Chains (Page, AZ)
          • Farley Canyon (Bullfrog, UT)
          • North Wash (Hite, UT)
      • Concession
        • Motorized and nonmotorized small boat rentals, Wahweap and Bullfrog (7 days/week)
        • Houseboat rentals, Wahweap and Bullfrog Marinas
        • Fuel docks, Stateline Launch Ramp in Wahweap District and at Hall’s Crossing
        • Bullfrog RV Park & Campground
        • Hite RV and Campground and Outpost Store
        • Halls Crossing
          • RV Park and Campground
          • Marina Store
          • Village Store
          • Laundry
          • Showers
        • Bullfrog
          • Defiance House Lodge and Gift Shop
          • Anasazi Restaurant
          • Boat Rentals Boat and Go Store
          • Bullfrog Dock and Stock
        • Wahweap
          • Lodging
          • Rainbow Room Restaurant
          • Wind Café
          • Driftwood To Go/Drinks
          • Driftwood Pool and Escalante Pool at Lake Powell Resort
          • Wahweap Grille (limited indoor seating, in addition to takeout)
          • Wahweap Dock & Stock
    • Grand Canyon National Park
      • All shuttle bus service suspended indefinitely. EXPECT TRAFFIC AND PARKING ISSUES.
      • Hermit Road closed to private vehicles. Access to overlooks will be limited to nonmotorized transportation (bicycles and pedestrian traffic). Hermit Road closed to private vehicles. Access to overlooks will be limited to nonmotorized transportation (bicycles and pedestrian traffic).
      • Open
        • Tuweep & Tuweep Campground
        • Rim Trail and Greenway Trail outside of residential areas
        • Day hiking on inner canyon trails and existing backcountry permits for hikers camping overnight will be honored. No new overnight camping permits for the inner canyon will be issued
        • Lodging services at El Tovar, Maswik Lodge, and Kachina Lodge
        • Trailer Village RV Park
        • Bicycle and Wheelchair rentals at Bright Angel Bicycles
        • East Desert View Drive until Navajo Point
        • South Rim’s south entrance open 24/7, and Mather Campground open
        • South Rim Food & Beverage Open
          • Yavapai Lodge Tavern
          • Canyon Village Market
          • Maswik Lodge Food Court
          • El Tovar Hotel Patio
          • Food Truck, Bright Angel Lodge
          • Bright Angel Bikes
        • South Rim Retail Shops
          • Grand Canyon Conservancy Park Store at Visitor Center Plaza
          • Canyon Village Market
          • El Tovar Hotel, Bright Angel Lodge, Hopi House, Lookout Studio
          • Bright Angel Bikes
        • North Rim open; lodging limited
          • General Store is open; fuel is available
      • Closed
        • East Entrance on South Rim and Desert View Watchtower area
        • Visitor Centers, museums and shuttles
        • Some lodging, camper services and trailer village
        • Center Road and all access to residential section of Grand Canyon Village
    • Lake Mead NRA (AZ/NV) (7/28)
      • Nevada has a 14 day quarantine in place for all visitors to limit #covid19
      • All Nevada entrances closed to most vehicles with below exception:
        • Following open to America the Beautiful Pass Holders ONLY
          • Boulder Entrance Station
          • Lake Mead Parkway Entrance Station
          • Northshore Entrance Station
          • Cottonwood Cove Entrance Station
      • Open in Nevada
        • Developed Campgrounds
        • All coves and roads in Eldorado Area, including:
          • Nelson Landing
          • Placer Cove
          • Aztec Wash
        • Coves in the Government Wash area, including but not limited to
          • Crawdad Cove
          • 8.0
          • Boxcar Cove
          • Stewarts Point
          • Saddle Cove
          • Nevada Telephone Cove
        • Coves along Powerline Road near Cottonwood Cove, including, but not limited to
          • Nine Mile Cove
          • Six Mile Cove
        • Closed in Nevada
          • Goldstrike Canyon
          • Alan Bible Visitor Center
          • Park Headquarters
          • Saddle Cove
      • No Arizona coronavirus closures
    • Montezuma’s Castle National Monument (7/28)
      • Outdoor spaces open
      • Restrooms, visitor center, museum closed
      • Montezuma Well closed/cerrado
    • Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (7/28)
      • Visitor Center – Closed
      • Backcountry Permits Suspended
      • Group Campground – Closed
      • Twin Peaks Campground closed
      • Alamo Campground closed
    • Petrified Forest National Park (7/28)
      • Park road and trails reopened 8 am May 29, 2020
      • Wilderness camping suspended
      • Painted Desert Inn Closed
      • Visitor Centers open 8-5
      • Credit Cards only at entrance stations
      • All decisions are based on safety of visitors and employees and available staffing.
    • Pipe Spring National Monument – Outdoor areas open
      • Visitor Center & Museum closed
      • Zion Forever bookstore closed
      • Interior of Winsor Castle closed
    • Tonto National Monument
      • Viewing area open from parking lot
      • Visitor Center & all trails remain closed
    • Tuzigoot National Monument
      • Outdoor areas open
      • Closed
        • Restrooms
        • Museum
        • Visitor center
    • Tumacacori National Historical Park
      • Visitor Center Closed
      • Museum Closed
      • Ranger programs suspended
    • Saguaro National Park
      • Visitor Centers closed; information, limited retail & restrooms available on patios 8-12
      • Ranger programs suspended
      • Group size limited to 10 people or fewer
    • Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument (7/28)
      • Sunset Crater Volcano has limited visitor access. All trails & restrooms open
      • Visitor center closed
      • Bookstore open curbside with limited selection Fri-Tues
    • Tuzigoot National Monument (7/28)
      • Outdoor areas open
      • Visitor center and musuem closed
    • Walnut Canyon National Monument (7/28)
      • Limited visitor access. Rim Trail and connecting Anniversary Site trail are open
      • Public restrooms open
      • All other trails and facilities, including visitor center remain closed
    • Wupatki National Monument (7/28)
      • Visitor Center Closed
Advertisements
  • Arkansas (7/28)
    • Fort Smith National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center Closed
    • Hot Springs National Park
      • Fordyce Bathhouse Visitor Center closed
      • Programming suspended
      • Bathhouse Row Emporium Closed
      • Hot Springs Mountain Tower and other Bathhouse Row businesses – check with business in question
    • Arkansas Post National Memorial
      • Visitor Center closed
    • Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center Closed
      • Little Rock CHS tours suspended indefinitely
    • Pea Ridge National Military Park – Visitor Center closed
  • California
    • Local travel only currently recommended
    • Cabrillo National Monument
      • Outdoor areas open 9 AM to 5 PM
      • Cabrillo Sea Cave closed
    • César E. Chávez National Monument – Visitor Center Closed; Memorial Garden open but no public restrooms
    • Channel Islands National Park
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Concession boat service to islands operating at 40% capacity
    • Golden Gate National Recreation Area
      • All parking areas and visitor facilities managed by NPS closed
      • Alcatraz Island Closed
      • Presidio VC Closed
      • Fort Point Closed
      • Golden Gate Bridge VC – Closed
      • Lands End Lookout Closed
      • Marin Headlands VC – Closed
      • Nike Missile Site Closed
      • Point Bonita Lighthouse – Closed
      • Stinson Beach – Closed
      • Kirby Cove Campground – Closed
      • Bicentennial Campground – Closed
      • Picnic areas
      • Parking Areas & Roads Closed
        • Baker Beach
        • West Bluff
        • Long Avenue
        • Battery East
        • Langdon Court
        • Navy Memorial
        • Merrie Way
        • Sloat Boulevard at Ocean Beach
        • Fort Funston
        • China Beach
        • Upper Fort Mason
        • Sutro Height
        • Muir Beach Overlook
        • Muir Beach
        • Rodeo Beach
        • Upper Conzelman Road
        • McCullough Road
        • Golden Gate overlook corridor
        • Northwest Commuter – Dillingham lot
        • Fort Baker and Horseshoe Cove parking areas
        • Stinson Beach
        • Tennessee Valley
        • Crissy Field-East Beach
    • John Muir National Historic Site (6/22)
      • Only outside grounds will be available to the public, including the orchard, picnic areas, as well as Mount Wanda.
      • Visitor center, Muir home, & Martinez Adobe closed
    • Joshua Tree National Park
      • Closed
        • Visitor Centers
        • Group Campsites
      • Cancellations
        • All programs
        • Campsite reservations through 9/4
        • All special use permits through 5/31
      • Open
        • Park entrances and entrance booths
        • Roads and parking lots
        • Trails
        • Individual campsites; pay at campground
        • Most bathroom facilities
    • Kings Canyon National Park – Park open; all facilities closed (cerrado)
    • Lassen Volcanic National Park
      • Open
        • 30 mile park road
        • Butte Lake Area
        • Warner Valley Area
        • All hiking trails except seasonal closures
        • Backcountry camping and stock use (free permit required)
        • Manzanita Lake campground
        • Southwest walk-in campground
      • Closed
        • No gas, food or services available within park
        • Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center and Loomis Museum remain closed
    • Lava Beds National Monument
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Cave Loop Road closed
      • Campground closed
      • Do not bring caving gear used in other caves into monument caves
    • Manzanar National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Block 14 exhibits closed
    • Mojave National Preserve
      • All visitor centers closed
      • Campgrounds closed
      • Restrooms closed
      • Zzyzx day use area closed
      • Lava Tube area closed
    • Pinnacles National Park
      • Open
        • Open to day use from 7:30-8
        • Parking lot on the east side of the park to vehicles. Once the parking area fills, vehicles will be not be allowed to form a line to wait for available spaces. Visitors are encouraged to arrive before 11 a.m. and after 3:30 p.m. if they wish to park inside the park. Due to increased wildland fire danger, parking along the roadside outside the park boundary is highly discouraged
        • Park road past the campground remains closed to vehicular traffic. Visitors may bike and/or hike from the campground further into the park. Bicycles are not permitted on park trails. Bike racks are located near all trailheads for the convenience of park visitors.
        • Prior camping reservations required
        • West entrance located outside Soledad, CA is open to vehicles, with the same restrictions on capacity – when the lots fill and no additional vehicles will be allowed into the park until multiple parking spaces are available. Visitor are encouraged to come early or in the late afternoon
      • All Nature Centers closed
      • All Visitor Centers closed
      • Shuttle service suspended
      • Trail closures
        • Bear Gulch Caves Trail
        • Balconies Caves Trail
        • High Peaks Steep Trail
        • High Peaks Narrow Trail
    • Point Reyes National Seashore
      • Visitor Centers Closed
      • Campgrounds closed
      • Most parking areas & many roads open to cars
        • Sir Francis Drake Boulevard west of its junction with Chimney Rock Road is closed to all traffic (i.e., motor vehicle, bicycle, pedestrian, etc.)
      • Certain park facilities with high-touch equipment or that encourage gathering–including drinking fountains, benches, picnic areas–also remain closed. Restrooms are open
      • All ranger led programs and volunteer activities are suspended or canceled.
    • Redwood National Park
      • Visitor Centers closed
      • Campgrounds closed
      • Backcountry sites closed
      • Some restrooms closed
    • Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area
      • Visitor centers closed
    • Sequoia National Park – Park open; all facilities closed (cerrado)
    • Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area
      • Visitor Center closed
    • Yosemite National Park
      • Yosemite National Park is open with limited services and facilities to those with day-use reservations, reservations for in-park lodging or camping, and wilderness or Half Dome permits
      • Tioga Road closed due to conditions; reopens Monday 6/15 at 9 am. Reservations required
  • Colorado
    • Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site
      • Bookstore Closed
      • Self guided tours available
      • All visitor services & programs suspended
      • Trail parking only available on SR 104
      • Frontier Skills Day cancelled
      • Volunteer Work Weekend postponed (date TBD)
    • Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park
      • Visitor Center closed
    • Colorado National Monument
      • Campground partially open
      • Visitor Center partially open
    • Curecanti National Recreation Area
      • Elk Creek Campground closed
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Picnic areas closed
      • East Elk Creek and Red Creek Campgrounds closed for summer to comply with county health orders regarding group sizes
      • Reopened
        • Blue Mesa Reservoir for boating and on-shore recreation
          • Elk Creek Boat Ramp and Inspection Station 5:30 am to 9 pm daily
          • Lake Fork Boat Ramp and Inspection Station 5:30 am to 9 pm daily
          • Iola Boat Ramp and Inspection Station 6 am to 4 pm daily
          • Boat-In dispersed camping at least 1/2 mile from developed areas including roads
          • Gunnison River from Riverway to Blue Mesa Reservoir with extreme caution advised for changing water conditions, strainers, and other hazards.
        • Due to an anticipated high number of vessel decontaminations, please be prepared to use any of the three open ramps/inspection stations to avoid crowding and delays in getting on the water. Decontaminations will be done 8 am to 4 pm daily.
        • Morrow Point and Crystal Reservoirs open; Morrow Point boat tours closed
    • Dinosaur National Monument
      • Monument roads, campgrounds, river operations and trails are open.
      • Visitor centers, Quarry Exhibit Hall closed
    • Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument
      • Visitor Center closed
    • Mesa Verde National Park
      • Closed
        • Mesa Verde Research and Visitor Center
        • Chapin Mesa Archeological Museum
        • All cliff dwellings and ranger-guided cliff dwelling tours
          • Includes continued closures of Cliff Palace, Balcony House, Long House, and Step House
        • Wetherill Mesa
      • Facilities and Services Open
        • Virtual Ranger Station
        • Morefield Campground
        • Farview Terrace Café and Gift Shop
        • Far View Lodge
        • Spruce Tree Terrace Café and Gift Shop
        • Chapin Mesa Picnic Area
        • Public Restrooms
        • Trash collection
      • Roads and Recreational Areas Open
        • Main Park Road
        • Far View Archeological Sites
        • Mesa Top Loop Road
        • Cliff Palace/Balcony House Loop Drive
        • Spruce Tree House Overlook
        • Hiking Trails on Morefield and Chapin Mesa
    • Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center & Park Store open; limited to 1 visitor within the building at any time and 15 minutes time limit
    • Rocky Mountain National Park
      • Many outlying areas and basic park road and trail access reopened
      • 60% of parking capacity reopened
      • Visitors can only purchase entrance passes at entrance stations with credit cards.
      • Timed entry reservation or campground reservation required through at least July 31
        • Reservations available 30-60 days in advance (i.e. July reservations available in June)
        • Permits issued using the reservation system will allow park visitors to enter the park within two-hour windows of availability between 6 a.m. through 5 p.m
        • To get a reservation, go to recreation.gov
  • Connecticut (7/28)
    • Weir Farm National Historic Site
      • Park Grounds and Parking Lot are open daily from 7am-5pm.
      • All facilities, including restrooms, remain closed
  • Delaware (7/28)
    • First State National Historical Park
      • Arsenal in New Castle closed
      • John Bell House closed
      • Old Swedes Historic Site closed
      • New Castle Court House Museum open by reservation Fri-Sun
      • John Dickinson Plantation open by reservation Fri-Sun
      • Old State House open by reservation Fri-Sun
      • Fort Christina closed
  • Florida
    • Big Cypress National Preserve
      • Visitor Centers closed
      • Ranger programs canceled
      • All campgrounds and restrooms closed indefinitely
    • Biscayne National Park
      • Kayak Launch and restrooms at Convoy Point open on limited basis
      • Facilities at Boca Chita, Elliott, Adams Keys open on limited basis.
      • Visitor events suspended.
      • Biscayne National Park Institute tours suspended
      • Rafting of marine vessels in park waters prohibited
    • De Soto National Memorial (7/28)
      • parking lot and nature trails are open
      • Visitor Center and restroom facilities remain closed
      • El estacionamiento y los senderos de De Soto National Memorial están abiertos
      • El centro de visitantes y las instalaciones del baño permanecen cerrados
    • Dry Tortugas National Park
      • Garden and Loggerhead Keys open
      • Camping open
      • All programs and services suspended
      • Concession ferries reopened
      • Marine waters and both harbors remain open
    • Everglades National Park
      • Closed
        • North Nest Key and areas 100 yards from shore closed indefinitely to all public entry
        • All programs suspended
        • All visitor centers and public buildings
      • Phased reopening underway; open areas include
        • Main Park Road from the Homestead entrance to Flamingo (note exceptions below)
        • External restrooms at the Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center
        • Flamingo Marina and boat launch ramps
        • Flamingo Marina Store, restrooms, and gas pumps
        • Flamingo Fish Cleaning Station and restroom
        • Chekika Day Use Area (roads and surrounding areas only)
        • East Everglades, accessible by 168th St. (9 a.m – 5 p.m.)
        • Marine waters of Everglades National Park
        • Beach campsites in wilderness
        • Royal Palm, including the Anhinga Trail
        • Research Road
        • Long Pine Key picnic area and trails
        • West Lake
        • Guy Bradley Trail and Flamingo Day Use area
        • Coastal Prairie Trail
        • Canoe, kayak and skiff rentals at Flamingo
        • Shark Valley Access Open
        • Concession Tours (Shark Valley, Flamingo and Everglades City boats) open at reduced capacities
        • Gulf Coast access from Everglades City open
        • Wilderness Campsites (chickees and ground sites) open
        • Flamingo campground
        • All other park restrooms
        • Nike Missile Site
        • Houseboat rentals
  • Georgia
    • Appalachian National Scenic Trail
      • Many Appalachian Trail overnight shelters and privies on NPS property closed indefinitely
        • Blue Ridge Parkway
        • Shenandoah National Park
        • Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park
        • Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area
        • AT Park Offices
          • Virginia (11 shelters, 12 privies)
          • Maryland (1 shelter, 2 privies)
          • Pennsylvania (8 shelters, 6 privies)
          • New Jersey (1 shelter, 1 privy)
          • New York (5 shelters, 5 privies)
          • Connecticut (7 shelters, 16 privies)
          • Massachusetts (1 shelter, 4 privies)
          • Maine (22 shelters, 29 privies)
      • ATC has requested hikers to postpone hikes on the Appalachian Trail and requested closure of trail
      • Appalachian Trail Conservancy Visitor Centers closed
      • Many shuttles and resupply locations closed (for more, visit https://wildeast.appalachiantrail.org/explore/plan-and-prepare/hiking-basics/health/covid19/a-t-closures/)
      • Georgia
        • Chattahoochee National Forest trailheads reopened but shelters and restrooms closed
      • North Carolina
        • Pisgah trailheads open; no acccess to shelters, restrooms/privies, or trash service
        • North Carolina State Park facilities closed
        • Fontana Hilton shelter closed by Tennessee Valley Authority
      • Tennesee/North Carolina
        • Campgrounds on National Forest Land are closed
        • Cherokee National Forest – trailheads reopened, but no access to shelters, restrooms/privies, or trash services
        • Nantahala National Forest – trailheads reopened, but no access to shelters, restrooms/privies, or trash services
      • Tennessee
        • All State Parks closed to overnight use by groups larger than 10 persons indefinitely
      • Virginia
        • Shenandoah National Park – Closed to overnight use indefinitely (see separate note)
        • Town of Glasgow AT Shelter closed
        • Triple Crown section of AT closed
        • Shelters and privies closed in George Washington and Jefferson National Forests (trailheads reopened)
        • Spy Rock Trailhead closed
        • Grayson Highlands overnight backpackers lot closed and quota for park entries
        • All State Park facilities closed
      • West Virginia
        • All public facilities closed at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park
      • Maryland
        • Shelters and camping areas on Appalachian Trail in Maryland Closed
          • Camping is now allowed at state-owned camping sites along the Appalachian Trail. Camping is also prohibited outside of these areas along the A.T. in Maryland (dispersed camping in Maryland is not allowed. Campers must camp at designated sites)
        • Campgrounds and cabins at Maryland State Parks remain closed
      • Pennsylvania
        • Shelters on Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources land closed
          • Deer Lick Shelter
          • Tumbling Run Shelter
          • Rocky Mountain Shelter
          • Quarry Gap Shelter
          • Birch Run Shelter
          • Toms Run Shelter
          • James Fry at Tagg Run
          • Eagles Nest Shelter
          • Leroy Smith Shelter
          • Kirkridge Shelter
        • Hamburg Burough watershed access closed
        • State Park and forest visitor centers, restrooms, campgrounds, and cabins closed on case by case basis
      • New Jersey
        • A.T. shelters and privies closed
        • Dunnfield Creek and NJDOT parking lots on the north side of I 80, and the A.T. between Rt. 517 and Barrett Road closed.
        • Additionally, the Pochuck Boardwalk and NJ 94 / Wawayanda Mountain area (“ Stairway to Heaven”) will remain closed
        • Worthington State Forest
          • Backpacker Campsite in Worthington State Forest
          • Dunnfield Creek and NJ DOT parking areas on the north side of Route 80 are CLOSED. Parking lots off Old Mine Road in Worthington State Forest remain OPEN. The Appalachian Trail and other trails can still be accessed at other parking lots in Worthington State Forest and the Delaware Water Gap Recreation Area
        • Wawayanda State Park
          • The A.T. between Route 517 in Glenwood and Barrett Road is CLOSED. This section contains both the Pochuck Boardwalk and Bridge near Rt. 517 and the “Stairway to Heaven” climb near Route 94. The boardwalk and bridge and “Stairway to Heaven” are too narrow for visitors to maintain the required six feet of social distancing and have seen severe overcrowding. Parking on Rt. 517 adjacent to the boardwalk, on Canal Road, and at Route 94 are all closed.
          • The remaining miles of the Appalachian Trail in Wawayanda State Park remain open
        • All backcountry campsites on Appalachian Trail and on Delaware River within Delaware River Water Gap NRA are closed until further notice
        • Delaware River Water Gap NRA
          • Kittatinny Point – closed (parking areas and boat launch)
          • Dunfield Creek – closed (parking areas and boat launch)
          • Bushkill Visitor Center – closed
          • Foster-Armstrong House – Closed
          • Nelden-Roberts Stonehouse – Closed
          • Montague Grange – Closed
          • Van Campen Inn – Closed
          • Millbrook buildings – closed
          • Walpack Center buildings – closed
          • All other volunteer-operated buildings – closed
      • New York
        • Overnight visitation to state parks prohibited
          • All state park playgrounds, athletic courts, and sporting fields closed
          • All campgrounds, cabins, and cottages closed through May 31
        • Some roads and facilities in Harriman State Park and Bear Mountain are closed. All trail shelters are closed at this time
      • Connecticut
        • All buildings on Connecticut State Park & Forest land closed
        • Camping season on state park and forest land postponed until June 11
        • Bulls Bridge Recreation Area closed indefinitely
        • River Road gate – CLOSED until Labor Day weekend
      • Massachusetts
        • All buildings, campsites, shelters, and privies on Massachusetts State Park and Forest land closed through June 7th
        • Camping prohibited along Appalachian Trail in Massachusetts
        • No trash collection or facilities available at state parks
      • Vermont
        • Overnight camping on the Green Mountain National Forest is prohibited in designated areas, campgrounds, and shelters, as described in the Order.
        • Restroom facilities are closed at this time. Click here for updates on Vermont State Parks
      • New Hampshire
        • All travelers arriving in New Hampshire required to self-quarantine for 14 days
        • All shelters and campsites are closed in the White Mountain National Forest
        • Appalachian Mountain Club (NH) has closed all huts through the White Mountains for 2020, suspended all food service, and suspended all staff and volunteer-led programming
      • Maine
        • All travelers arriving in Maine required to self-quarantine for 14 days through August
        • Baxter State Park will be closed to camping, vehicular access, and travel above treeline until further notice. All Katahdin trailheads are closed at trailheads. The Park’s target opening date is July 1. The Park will remain open for walk-in day use below treeline
        • Baxter State Park offices and headquarters closed
        • All overnight shelters closed on state lands
      • For business impacts state-by-state: https://wildeast.appalachiantrail.org/explore/plan-and-prepare/hiking-basics/health/covid19/a-t-closures/
    • Andersonville National Historic Site
      • National Prisoner of War Museum closed
      • Restrooms closed
      • National Cemetery closed weekends
    • Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area
      • All park trails open
      • All river access open
      • Parking areas open
      • All picnic areas are closed
      • Hewlett Lodge Visitor Center is closed
    • Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park
      • Open
        • Chickamauga Battlefield
          • All roads
          • All picnic areas
          • All trails (foot traffic only – horse trails closed due to storm damage)
        • Lookout Mountain Battlefield
          • All trails
          • All picnic areas
          • Sanders Road
          • Cravens House Parking
        • Missionary Ridge
        • Orchard Knob
        • Moccasin Bend National Archeological District
          • All Trails
      • Closed/Cerrado
        • Chickamauga Battlefield
          • Visitor Center
          • Wilder Brigade Monument
          • Vault toilets
          • Recreation field
          • America’s National Parks Bookstore
        • Lookout Mountain Battlefield
          • Point Park
          • Ochs Museum
          • Ochs Observation Deck
          • Lookout Mountain Visitor Center & parking lot
          • Sunset Rock parking
          • America’s National Parks bookstore
        • Signal Point
      • Fort Pulaski National Monument (6/22)
        • Fort Pulaski trails, parking lots, and visitor center restrooms are open.
        • Historic Fort Pulaski, the visitor center, and the north shoreline are closed
      • Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park
        • Trails and parking lots open
        • Mountain Road closed
        • Visitor Center/restrooms closed
        • Horse trailer parking area closed
      • Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park (6/22)
        • Grounds will be open starting June 1st from 1:00 to 5:00 pm daily.
        • The Visitor Center and Earth Lodge remains closed.
  • Hawaii
    • Haleakala National Park (6/22)
      • Limited Areas in the Summit District are open daily, 9 am- 5 pm.
      • All visitor centers, the Kīpahulu District, the Crater trails and backcountry areas remain closed.
    • Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (6/22)
      • Chain of Craters Road past Mauna Ulu, overnight use of the backcountry, many visitor services and restrooms remain closed.
    • Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (6/22)
      • All hiking trails for daytime exercise and outdoor recreation.
      • Beach and shoreline areas for hiking, ocean recreation and fishing.
      • All portable toilets open
      • Visitor Center and Kaloko Rd remain closed.
    • Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site (6/22)
      • Covered, open air lanai area open at visitor center daily 7:30am-5:00pm.
      • Indoor museum and store remains closed at this time.
    • Pu’uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park (6/22)
      • All hiking trails for daytime exercise, beach and shoreline areas for ocean recreation and fishing, and restroom facilities will be open.
      • All other areas remain closed.
  • Idaho
    • Craters of the Moon National Monument (6/22)
      • All caves and north Crater Flow Trail closed
    • Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument – Visitor Center closed
    • Minidoka National Historic Site – Visitor Center closed
  • Illinois
    • Pullman National Monument – Visitor Center closed, restrooms closed, programs suspended
  • Indiana
    • George Rogers Clark National Historical Park (6/22)
      • Visitor Center is Open.
      • The Clark Memorial is open from 10-12 and 1-3
    • Indiana Dunes National Park – All buildings closed (beach access under unrelated closure)
    • Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial – Visitor Center closed
  • Iowa
    • Effigy Mounds National Monument
      • Park trails open
      • Visitor Center and facilities remain closed
    • Herbert Hoover National Historic Site
      • Park grounds, paths and trails are open
      • Visitor center and historic buildings remain closed
  • Kansas
    • Fort Larned National Historic Site – Visitor Center and historic buildings closed
    • Fort Scott National Historic Site – All park buildings closed
    • Nicodemus National Historic Site – Visitor Center closed
    • Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve
      • All buildings closed
      • Bus tours canceled until June 30th
  • Kentucky
    • Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park – All buildings closed (including visitor center and Memorial); grounds and trails open
    • Camp Nelson Heritage National Monument – All public buildings closed
    • Mammoth Cave National Park
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Cave tours suspended
      • Campground closed
  • Kentucky/Virginia
    • Cumberland Gap National Historical Park
      • All trails open
      • All backcountry campsites open
      • Closed
        • Pinnacle Road
        • Wilderness Road campground
        • Visitor Center
        • Picnic Shelters
        • Restrooms
  • Louisiana
    • Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve
      • All buildings closed
      • Barataria Preserve closed
  • Maine
    • Acadia National Park
      • All park roads closed
      • All facilities closed
      • All carriage roads closed
      • All campgrounds closed
      • All restrooms and visitor centers/services closed
      • Assistance available by phone or email
    • Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument
      • Campsites and lean-tos closed
      • Haskell and Big Spring Brook Huts closed
      • Millinocket contact station closed
    • Saint Croix Island International Historic Site – all services and facilities closed
  • Maryland
    • Antietam National Battlefield
      • Visitor Center closed.
      • Observation Tower closed, reopening delayed by COVID-19.
    • Assateague Island National Seashore (7/28)
      • Maryland District Open
        • Recreational beaches open
        • Maryland OSV zone open
        • Nature trails open
        • North Beach, South Beach, Ferry Landing and Bayside Peninsula open
        • Campground open
      • Virginia District
        • Toms Cove Visitor Center closed
        • Toms Cove parking closed
        • Beach restrooms closed
        • Toms Cove boardwalk closed
    • Catoctin Mountain Park
      • Visitor Center closed; restrooms and drinking water unavailable
      • Camp Round Meadow closed
      • Poplar Grove Youth Campground closed
      • Adirondack shelters closed
      • Owens Creek Campground closed
      • Camp Misty Mount closed
      • All public programming suspended
    • C & O Canal National Historical Park
      • Visitor centers & restrooms closed
      • All campgrounds and campsites closed
      • Water sources closed
      • Some parking areas closed, including Great Falls, Fletchers Cove, and Carderock; others limited
      • All drive-in and group campgrounds closed
      • All permits, reservations, and applications for demonstrations and special events cancelled and suspended indefinitely
    • Civil War Defenses of Washington – Ranger programs suspended
    • Hampton National Historic Site – All park facilities and parking closed. Pedestrians allowed on grounds from dawn to dusk.
    • Monocacy National Battlefield – Visitor Center Closed
    • Piscataway Park
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Accokeek Creek Boardwalk Closed
    • Thomas Stone National Historic Site – All buildings closed
  • Massachusetts
    • Cape Cod National Seashore – All public buildings closed
      • Salt Pond Visitor Center
        • Staffed outdoor information station and short ranger talks
      • Province Lands Visitor Center
        • Staffed outdoor information station and short ranger talks
    • Minute Man National Historical Park – Visitor Centers closed
      • Restroom locations: North Bridge on Monument St, Meriam House, Hartwell Tavern parking lot, Minute Man VC
      • Staffed info tables and areas: Daily 9am-5pm at North Bridge, North Bridge VC, Minute Man VC
      • Park store open Wed-Sun, 10am-5pm
  • Michigan
    • Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
      • All visitor facilities closed until June 25th
      • Visitor centers
      • Drive-in campgrounds
      • Backcountry campgrounds
      • Restrooms
    • Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore
      • Visitor Center and campgrounds closed
      • Trails closed
      • Trailheads closed
      • Picnic areas closed
      • Parking areas closed
      • Boat launches closed
      • Following facilities closed until July 1
        • Pierce Stocking Scenic Drive
        • South Manitou Island museums
        • South Manitou Island campgrounds
        • North Manitou Island campsites
        • Glen Haven museums
        • Maritime Museum
  • Minnesota
    • Mississippi National River and Recreation Area – Visitor Center closed
    • Pipestone National Monument – Visitor Center closed
    • Voyageurs National Park
      • Visitor Centers and HQ closed, may remain closed through 2020 summer season
  • Mississippi
    • Vicksburg National Military Park
    • Visitor center & USS Cairo Museum closed
    • Park tour road open 8-5 daily
  • Missouri
    • Gateway Arch National Park – Gateway Arch and Old Courthouse closed
    • George Washington Carver National Monument – Visitor Center closed
    • Harry S Truman National Historic Site – Grounds of Truman Farm in Grandview open; all else closed
    • Missouri National Recreational River
      • Park headquarters and visitor contact station closed
    • Ozark National Scenic Riverways
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Campgrounds closed
      • Some trail sections temporarily closed
      • All commercial activities, including all authorized outfitters, suspended
      • Beginning May 9th, the following changes will be implemented
        • Park concession operations and outfitters will be authorized to open for business at their discretion, as they are able to meet CDC guidelines.
        • Camping on gravel bars while engaging in multi-day floats and dispersed camping along the Ozark Trail while engaging in multi-day hikes will be allowed.
        • The Spring Branch hiking trails at Big Spring and Alley Spring will reopen, as well as the staircase into Devils Well
    • Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Museum closed
      • Bookstore closed
      • Library closed
  • Montana
    • Big Hole National Battlefield – Visitor Center closed
    • Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area
      • North District (Fort Smith, MT)
        • All campgrounds closed
        • MK Hill Closed
        • Government Camp closed
        • Afterbay Lake access through Government Camp closed
        • All restrooms closed
        • Ok-A-Beh Road and Marina closed
        • Visitor Center Closed
      • South District – Visitor Center Closed
    • Glacier National Park
      • Phased reopening plan extends through June 30th
      • West entrance to the park will open by 8:00 am, as conditions permit, and close at 4:30 pm. After 4:30 pm additional entries will not be allowed, including hikers and bikers. Visitors already in the park are not required to leave by 4:30 and are free to exit after finishing their recreational activities.
      • No overnight use of the park is permitted at this time and the campgrounds and lodges are currently closed
      • Visitors will be able to access Apgar and Going-to-the-Sun Road as far as Lake McDonald Lodge
      • Hikers and bikers can go as far as they like on Going to the Sun Road past Lake McDonald Lodge at their own risk. Visitors are discouraged from going past the Loop due to falling rock and avalanche danger. Depending on avalanche concerns, closure may be instituted on a case-by-case basis
      • Restrooms will remain open after 4:30 pm. A few public bathrooms in the park will not be open this year due to the increased cleaning frequency required by COVID-19 mitigations. One of those is the Education Center facilities in Apgar. Those bathrooms are closed this year to allow the other facilities to be cleaned and disinfected more frequently
      • Lake McDonald is currently the only waters open to boating (non-motorized only.) The Aquatic Inspection Station is open at Apgar from 9am-7pm. All watercraft must be cleaned thoroughly before coming to inspection station. Please review the park’s website regarding watercraft prior to arrival
      • East entrances from the Blackfeet Reservation will remain closed. The park is consulting with the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council to establish reopening dates for entrances from the reservation
      • Glacier Park Boat Company is suspending all boat tour and small boat rental operations for the 2020 season. If the prevailing conditions change and there becomes an opportunity to operate this summer, they may reevaluate this decision
      • Waterton Inter-Nation Shoreline Cruises operates out of Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada. Boat landings at Goat Haunt will not be permitted in 2020. Boat tours currently closed until July 1. Boat tours after July are still to be determined
      • Glacier National Park Lodges has announced the delayed opening of their lodging, food service, and gift shop operations in the park until June 15
      • Granite Park and Sperry Chalets plan to open as previously scheduled. They will be open to overnight guests only
      • Sun Tours and Glacier National Park Lodges Red Bus Tours are suspended for the time being
      • Food service throughout the park will be limited and will be take-out only
      • Swan Mountain Outfitters begins horseback rides at Apgar on June 13. They will open the rides at Lake McDonald Lodge, and Many Glacier later this summer. Contact them for dates of service
      • Glacier Guides is planning on providing guided hiking and camping as trail systems and backcountry campgrounds access allows. Proposed to start day hikes on June 12 and overnight trips on June 20
      • Many Glacier Campground reservations for the 2020 season have been cancelled and it is closed for the season due to lack of staff to manage campground operations
      • Due to similar staffing limitations and safety measures, frontcountry camping reservations for the Fish Creek Campground and the group sites at Apgar Campground have been cancelled through June 25
      • Reservations at the St. Mary Campground have been cancelled through June 30 to align with the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council’s proclamation against non-essential travel
      • Backcountry Permits
        • Backcountry permits will be available starting June 26
        • There will be no undesignated camping permits or advance reservations for the 2020 summer season. All backcountry permits will be obtained using the first come, first served walk-in system
        • Starting June 26, permits can be purchased on the west side at Apgar Visitor Center from 8am-4pm. Tentatively starting by July 1, permits can be purchased on the east side at St. Mary Visitor Center from 8am- 4pm. These are the only locations where backcountry permits can be purchased for the 2020 season. Permits will not be obtainable at Many Glacier, Two Medicine, Polebridge, or Waterton this summer. Credit and debit cards will be the only form of payment accepted in 2020
        • Masks or cloth face coverings are strongly encouraged to be worn while inside backcountry permit offices. Backcountry staff will be wearing them out of respect for public health. Physical distancing guidelines will be observed at all backcountry permit offices, which may result in longer wait times and/or lines outside the office buildings. A maximum of four people will be allowed in the backcountry office at any time. Any additional party members may join the group for a safety briefing outdoors after a permit is obtained
      • Map of open/closed areas can be found at: https://www.nps.gov/glac/planyourvisit/upload/Opening_June08_Map-2.jpg
    • Grant-Kohrs Ranch National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center closed; tours suspended
      • Parking lots closed
      • Historic buildings closed
  • Nebraska
    • Agate Fossil Beds National Monument – Visitor Center closed
    • Scotts Bluff National Monument – Visitor Center & summit road closed
    • Homestead National Monument of America
      • Heritage and Education Centers closed
      • Palmer-Epard Cabin closed
      • Freeman School closed
      • Ranger programs suspended
      • Digital learning opportunities available, contact park
    • Niobrara National Scenic River
      • Visitor Center Closed
  • Nevada
    • Great Basin National Park
      • Grounds are open, day use only
        • Restrooms open on rotating schedule
      • Trails open, but mostly covered in deep snow at higher elevations
      • Most park roads open
        • Entrance road to Lehman Caves Visitor Center
        • Scenic drive to Mather Overlook (first 6 miles)
        • Baker Creek road and trailhead
        • Snake Creek road and trailhead
        • Strawberry Creek road and trailhead
      • Visitor centers closed
      • Campgrounds closed
      • Café closed
      • Bookstore accessible online at https://store.wnpa.org/national-park-stores/great-basin-national-park.html
      • Park concessions closed
      • Dump station closed
      • All ranger programs and cave tours have been suspended
  • New Jersey
    • Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area
      • Public facilities closed; trails open except in Kittatinny Point area and at PEEC
      • River and Appalachian Trail campsites closed
    • Morristown National Historical Park
      • Jockey Hollow and New Jersey Brigade grounds and trails open
        • Jockey Hollow access through Temple Wick entrance
      • Fort Nonsense area closed
      • All buildings closed
      • All restrooms closed
    • Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park
      • Grounds open
      • State restrictions apply
        • Parking limited to 50% capacity
        • Prohibiting picnics
        • Social distancing to be practiced except with immediate family members, caretakers, household members, or romantic partners
        • No organized or contact activities or sports; and gatherings of any kind
  • New Mexico
    • Aztec Ruins National Monument – Visitor Center closed indefinitely
    • Bandelier National Monument
      • Mostly closed indefinitely
        • Frijoles Canyon closed
        • Visitor Center closed
        • Main Loop Trail closed
        • WNPA Store closed
        • Sirphey at Bandelier restauraunt closed
        • Tsankawi, Juniper, Ponderosa campgrounds closed
    • Capulin Volcano National Monument
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Park store closed
      • Volcano Road closed
    • Carlsbad Caverns National Park – Cavern and Visitor Center closed
    • Chaco Culture National Historical Park – Visitor Center & campground closed
    • El Malpais National Monument
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Cave permits suspended
      • Sandstone Bluffs Overlook closed
    • Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument
      • Visitor Center, bathrooms closed
      • Trailhead Museum closed
      • All campgrounds closed by US Forest Service
    • Manhattan Project National Historical Park
      • Oak Ridge Unit Visitor Center closed & programs suspended
      • Los Alamos Unit Visitor Center closed indefinitely
      • Hanford Unit Visitor Center closed indefinitely & programs suspended
    • Pecos National Historical Park – Visitor Center closed; programs and fishing suspended
    • Petroglyph National Monument – Visitor Center and all vault toilet facilities closed
  • New York
    • Fire Island National Seashore
      • All public buildings closed
      • All public restrooms closed
      • All marinas closed
    • Gateway National Recreation Area
      • All park buildings & restrooms closed
    • Sagamore Hill National Historic Site
      • Park grounds, the parking lot, and most walking paths are open.
      • All buildings, restrooms, and the beach area remain closed.
    • Saratoga National Historical Park (6/22)
      • Park facilities are closed.
      • The tour road is closed to vehicles. The grounds are open to pedestrians and cyclists from sunrise to sunset.
  • North Carolina
    • Blue Ridge Parkway
      • Visitor Centers closed indefinitely
      • Folk Art center closed indefinitely
      • All campgrounds closed
      • All backcountry campsites closed
      • Peaks of Otter Lodge closed
      • Pisgah Inn Closed
      • All Concession facilities, food service, and stores closed
    • Cape Hatteras National Seashore
      • All indoor buildings closed
      • Bodie Island lighthouse closed
      • Cape Hatteras Lighthouse closed
      • Campsites only available via online reservation
      • All programs suspended
      • Okracoke Island boat slips closed
    • Cape Lookout National Seashore
      • All park facilities and services closed
      • Beaches closed to groups of more than 10 people
    • Fort Raleigh National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Visitors prohibited from entering Dare and Hyde Counties until 5/16
    • Great Smoky Mountains National Park
      • Open
        • Road
          • Big Creek Road
          • Cades Cove Loop Road (will open daily at 8:00 a.m. No closures for bicycles only)
          • Cherokee Orchard Road
          • Clingmans Dome Road
          • Cosby Road
          • Deep Creek Road
          • Foothills Parkway
          • Gatlinburg Bypass
          • Greenbrier Road (Due to roadwork, open to Ramsey Cascades Trailhead only)
          • Lakeview Drive
          • Laurel Creek Road
          • Little River Road
          • Newfound Gap Road
          • Roring Fork Motor Nature Trail
          • Tom Branch Road
          • Tow String Road
          • Tremont Road
          • Upper Tremont Road
          • Wear Cove Gap Road
        • Open ONLY to pedestrians and cyclists
          • Abrams Creek Road
          • Balsam Mountain Road
          • Cataloochee Road
          • Elkmont Road
          • Forge Creek Road
          • Heintooga Round Bottom Road
          • Highway 284
          • Little Greenbrier Road
          • Rich Mountain Road
          • Straight Fork Road
          • Twentymile Road
      • Restrooms
        • Sugarlands Visitor Center
        • Newfound Gap
        • Oconaluftee Visitor Center
        • Restrooms near Cable Mill, Cades Cove
        • Abrahm Falls Trailhead
        • Rainbow Falls Trailhead
        • Open picnic areas
      • Picnic Areas (pavilions must be reserved)
        • Big Creek
        • Cosby
        • Chimney Tops
        • Metcalf Bottoms
        • Cades Cove
        • Deep Creek
        • Collins Creek
      • Backcountry operations
        • All trails, shelters and backcountry campsites are open with reduced capacity limits
        • Many trailheads not accessible due to road access
    • Guilford Courthouse National Military Park
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Parking lots closed
      • Tour road closed to cars
      • Interpretive programming suspended
    • Moores Creek National Battlefield – All park facilities closed
      • Wright Brothers National Memorial
        • All indoor areas closed
  • North Dakota
    • Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site – Visitor Center & historic buildings closed
    • Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site – Visitor Center closed
    • Theodore Roosevelt National Park
      • Open
        • All trails and trailheads open
        • All roads in the North and South Units
        • Limited restrooms
        • Picnic areas
        • Backcountry camping
        • Elkhorn Ranch Unit
      • Closed
        • North Unit Visitor Center
        • South Unit Visitor Center
        • Painted Canyon Visitor Center & Rest Area
        • All campgrounds
  • Ohio
    • Cuyahoga Valley National Park
      • Visitor Centers closed & programs suspended
      • Brandywine Falls boardwalk closed
      • No drinking water available in park
    • Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park
      • Wright Dunbar Interpretive Center closed
      • Wright Cycle Co. Bike Shop closed
      • Huffman Prairie Flying Field closed
      • Paul Lawrence Dunbar House Historic Site closed
    • Hopewell Culture National Historical Park
      • Mound City Group Visitor Center & restrooms closed
    • James A. Garfield National Historic Site – Visitor Center and Garfield Home closed
  • Oklahoma
    • Chickasaw National Recreation Area
      • Travertine Nature Center Closed
      • Campgrounds closed
      • Travertine Creek closed to swimming
      • East Perimeter Road closed
    • Washita Battlefield National Historic Site – Visitor Center closed & programs suspended
  • Oregon (6/21)
    • Crater Lake National Park (6/21)
      • Visitor center closed
      • Ranger programs suspended
    • Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve – Visitor Center open; cave tours suspended (6/21)
    • John Day Fossil Beds National Monument – Visitor Center closed (6/21)
  • Pennsylvania
    • Allegheny Portage Railroad National Historic Site
      • All buildings closed; grounds and trails open
    • Flight 93 National Memorial
      • All buildings closed
    • Fort Necessity National Battlefield
      • Grounds and trails open
      • Visitor Center and Mount Washington Tavern closed
    • Friendship Hill National Historic Site
      • Grounds and trails open
      • Gallatin House closed
    • Johnstown Flood National Memorial
      • All buildings closed, services limited
    • Gettysburg National Military Park
      • Museum, Visitor Center, and all comfort stations closed indefinitely
      • Pennsylvania Memorial upper level and all observation towers closed
    • Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (6/22)
      • Main parking lot and restrooms are open.
      • All facilities, the Visitor Center and Hopewell Village remain closed. 
      • Open Wed – Sun, 9 am to 5 pm
    • Valley Forge National Historical Park (6/22)
      • Grounds, trails and parking lots are now open.
      • Buildings and facilities, including the Visitor Center and Washington’s Headquarters remain closed.
      • Some restrooms are open
  • South Carolina
    • Cowpens National Battlefield – Visitor Center & restrooms closed
    • Kings Mountain National Military Park – Visitor Center & restrooms closed
    • Ninety Six National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Restrooms closed
      • Pond closed
    • Reconstruction Era National Historical Park – Visitor Center closed
  • South Dakota
    • Badlands National Park
      • Visitor Centers closed & ranger programs suspended
      • South District closed in compliance with Oglala Lakota tribe shelter in place order
    • Jewel Cave National Monument – Visitor Center closed (cave under seasonal closure due to repairs to tour route)
    • Minuteman Missile National Historic Site – Delta-01 tours suspended (through 6/1) & Visitor Center closed indefinitely
    • Mount Rushmore National Memorial
      • Parking (Xanterra operated) open
      • Information Center closed
      • Programs suspended
      • Lincoln Borglum Visitor Center, amphitheater, and Avenue of Flags under temporary deferred maintenance closure regardless
      • Nature Trail and the Presidential Trail open
    • Wind Cave National Park
      • Visitor Center closed & programs suspended; cave tours closed due to elevator outage regardless
      • Campground closed
  • Tennessee
    • Andrew Johnson National Historic Site
      • All facilities and buildings closed
    • Fort Donelson National Battlefield
      • Park lands and roads accessible
      • All buildings closed
    • Stones River National Battlefield
      • Visitor Center and restrooms closed
    • Obed Wild and Scenic River
      • Visitor Centers closed and programs suspended
      • Campground closed indefinitely
    • Shiloh National Military Park
      • Shiloh Battlefield Visitor Center & Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center closed
      • Visitor center parking lot closed
      • Picnic area closed
      • Restrooms closed
      • Memorial Day commemoration canceled
  • Texas
    • Amistad National Recreation Area
      • Visitor Center & campgrounds closed
      • Daily picnicking areas closed
    • Big Bend National Park
      • Phased reopening began 6/1
      • Open
        • Scenic driving and bicycling along all paved park roads
        • Selected frontcountry trails for day hiking
        • Rio Grande for day-use river trips from paved road access points. Group size limits apply.
        • Panther Junction Gas Station and camp store.
        • Fossil Discovery Exhibit
        • Restroom facilities
      • Closed
        • All Visitor Centers.
        • Chisos Mountains Lodge overnight accommodations.
        • All campgrounds and backcountry campsites.
        • All gravel roads and backcountry roads.
        • The Hot Springs Historic Area and associated trails.
        • Boquillas Port of Entry
    • Big Thicket National Preserve
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Lakeview Sandbar and Day Use Area closed
    • Fort Davis National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center & Park Store closed
      • Historic buildings closed
      • Restrooms closed
    • Lake Meredith National Recreation Area
      • Mooring docks and fishing piers closed to fishing
    • Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park
      • LBJ Ranch Unit closed
      • Johnson City visitor facilities closed
      • Johnson Settlement remains open
    • Padre Island National Seashore
      • Visitor Center closed
  • Utah
    • Arches National Park
      • Phased reopening began 5/29
        • Open
          • All park roads, trails, and restrooms,
          • Commercial operations as previously permitted
          • Climbing/canyoneering permits
        • Closed
          • Visitor centers and park stores
          • The Fiery Furnace and backcountry camping at Arches
          • Devils Garden Campground
    • Bryce Canyon National Park
      • Open
        • The main road and all viewpoints to Rainbow Point
        • Visitor Center and bookstore: outdoor and indoor operations from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The theater and museum remain closed, and in accordance with regional public health guidance on group gatherings, indoor visitor occupancy will be limited for retail or restroom access only
        • In the Bryce Amphitheater area, restrooms are available at Sunset Point (24 hrs), Inspiration Point (24 hrs)
        • Along the southern Scenic Drive, restrooms are available at Farview and Rainbow Points (24 hrs)
        • All trails within the Bryce Amphitheater area, including the Navajo Loop
        • Mossy Cave parking, restroom, and trail area (this area may temporarily close for short periods due to construction)
        • Horseback rides
        • General Store open
        • Closed
          • Sunset Campground (reopens 6/7)
          • Private horse reservations (6/15)
          • Backcountry trails and permits for backcountry camping (7/1)
    • Canyonlands National Park
      • Open
        • All park roads, trails, and restrooms
        • Commercial operations as previously permitted
        • Backcountry permits
      • Closed
        • Visitor centers and park stores
        • Willow Flat Campground at Island in the Sky district
        • Needles Campground in The Needles district of Canyonlands
    • Capitol Reef National Park
      • Open
        • Scenic Drive
        • Backcountry Camping
        • Canyoneering
        • All Trails
        • Cathedral District
        • Waterpocket District
        • Cedar Mesa Campground
      • Closed
        • Visitor Center
        • Gifford House
        • Fruita Campground
      • Reservations for the Fruita Campground for the period of June 2 – July 31 resumed 5/18; other dates will continue to open on a rolling six month basis. The Group Site will remain closed at this time.
    • Cedar Breaks National Monument
      • Cedar Breaks Scenic Road open
      • All viewpoints and parking lots open
      • Visitor Center, restrooms, trails, and campground closed
    • Golden Spike National Historical Park – Visitor Center closed
    • Natural Bridges National Monument
      • Park grounds and trails open
      • Visitor Center and campground closed
    • Rainbow Bridge National Monument – Navajo Nation visitor ban has closed land route (technically located on Navajo Nation as well)
    • Zion National Park
      • Closed
        • Kolob Canyons
        • Zion Lodge (partially)
        • South Campground
        • Museum and Theatre
        • Angels Landing Chains Section
        • Canyon Overlook Trail
        • Wilderness and Recreation Permits
        • Climbing and Canyoneering
        • Overnight backpacking and any thruhiking
        • Narrows (due to high flow)
        • Lower Emerald Pools (due to trail construction)
        • Weeping Rock Area (due to rockfall)
        • Hiking during Limited Operations
      • Hiking
        • In and out day hiking from all trailheads only.
        • Hikers must remain on established trails.
        • No cross-country travel or off-trail travel.
        • Hop Valley trail can not be used to access Kolob Canyons area.
      • Open
        • Zion Canyon Scenic Drive is open to private vehicles as parking allows. No vehicles over 23 feet long. Last entry to the Scenic Drive is 6pm.
        • The Zion-Mount Carmel Highway (State Route 9) is open. It may be temporarily closed to vehicles in the event of severe traffic congestion.
        • Mount Carmel Tunnel – Escorts from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm.
        • Pa’rus Trail – A great hike from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center where there is usually plenty of parking.
        • Archeology Trail – Hike from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center.
        • Grotto Trail – A great way to hike from the parking at the Zion Lodge to the Grotto Trailhead.
        • Riverside Walk – The closest thing to the Narrows until the river level goes down.
        • Watchman Trail – A great hike from the Zion Canyon Visitor Center where there is usually plenty of parking.
        • Sand Bench Trail – a longer moderate hike that can be started from the Court of the Patriarchs.
        • Upper Emerald Pools and the Kayenta Trail – the only access to Upper Emerald Pools is from the Grotto Trailhead and the Kayenta Trail. Lower Emerald Pools remains closed.
        • The West Rim Trail to Scout Lookout – The Angels Landing Chains Section remains closed.
  • Virgin Islands
    • Buck Island Reef National Monument
      • Boating activities in open waters open
      • All permits suspended and canceled, including anchoring and mooring permits
      • Some park facilities closed, including picnic areas and comfort station
      • All concession boating operations suspended until further notice
      • USVI travel restrictions in place
    • Christiansted National Historic Site
      • All park events and permits cancelled until further notice
      • Fort Christiansvaern, parking lot and visitor restrooms closed
      • Eastern National Bookstore closed
      • All park administrative buildings closed
      • USVI travel restrictions in place
    • Virgin Islands National Park
      • Cruz Bay Visitor Center closed & programs suspended
      • Food service and watersports rental at Trunk Bay suspended
      • USVI travel restrictions in place
  • Virginia
    • Cedar Creek and Belle Grove National Historical Park – Visitor Center & contact stations closed
    • Colonial National Historical Park
      • Jamestown and Yorktown Visitor Centers closed; programs suspended
      • Colonial Parkway closed to traffic from Rt 199 to Jamestown Island (open to bicycles and pedestrians)
    • Fort Monroe National Monument
      • All public programming & indoor rooms of fort closed
      • Vehicular access closed north of De Russy Field on Fenwick Road
      • Beach access limited
    • Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park
      • All public buildings closed and programs canceled through 6/10
    • George Washington Memorial Parkway
      • Great Falls Park and Belle Haven parking open and adaptively managed
      • Most parking areas have reopened. This includes the following:
        • Theodore Roosevelt Island
        • Gravelly Point
        • Dyke Marsh
        • Riverside Park
        • Fort Hunt Park
        • Turkey Run has reopened due to damage to resources caused by visitors parking on the grass leading to the formerly closed lots. Please do not park in areas that may damage park resources.
        • Please do not park on non-durable surfaces, such as grass.
      • Arlington House closed for separate reasons ; reopening delayed.
      • For the South District, which I work on, we will have one ranger available daily to answer phones in the morning and rove the parkway in the afternoon
      • Bird walks at Dyke Marsh have been suspended indefinitely by Friends of Dyke Marsh.
      • All ranger programming and permits canceled indefinitely
      • Great Falls Vsitor Center closed
      • Restrooms open until approximately 4-4:30
    • Manassas National Battlefield Park – Henry Hill Visitor Center & Brawner Farm Interpretive Center closed
    • Petersburg National Battlefield – Visitor Centers and contact stations closed
    • Prince William Forest Park
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Campgrounds closed
      • Chopawamsic Backcountry area closed to all overnight camping
      • Cabin Camps closed
      • Roads closed to vehicular traffic. Bicycle and foot access only
    • Richmond National Battlefield Park – Visitor Centers closed through 6/10
    • Shenandoah National Park
      • Open
        • Skyline Drive and most trails open 5 AM-10 PM
      • Closed
        • All boundary trailheads and picnic areas
        • Old Rag trails
        • Whiteoak Canyon trails
    • Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts (seasonal closure of venue, trail open, restrooms closed)
      • All events canceled for season
  • Washington
    • Klondike Gold Rush – Seattle Unit
      • Outdoor Recreation Information Center closed due to REI closure
      • Visitor Center & Museum closed (rangers can be reached at 206-220-4240)
    • Mount Rainier National Park
      • Fishing closed statewide
      • All park roads closed to vehicles (backcountry areas remain open), with following exceptions
        • SR 123 to Cayuse Pass is open. There is no vehicle access to the Ohanapecosh Campground & Vistor Center; walk-in only
        • Dispersed recreation at Carbon River. Self-register for wilderness permits at the Carbon River Ranger Station
          • Fairfax Forest Reserve Road E. remains closed at the Forest Service Road 7810 Bridge outside of the park just before the Carbon River Entrance
      • All park visitor centers closed
      • All park lodges closed
      • All park shops and restauraunts closed
    • North Cascades National Park Service Complex
      • Lake Chelan National Recreation Area (seasonal access limited)
        • Stehekin marina and public docks open for day use only
        • Trails open for day use only
        • Closed
          • All campgrounds
          • All backcountry campsites
          • All visitor and wilderness information centers
      • North Cascades National Park (seasonal access limited)
        • Trails open for day use only
        • Closed
          • Cascade River Road
          • All campgrounds
          • All backcountry campsites
          • All visitor and wilderness information centers
      • Ross Lake National Recreation Area (seasonal access limited)
        • Open
          • Diablo Overlook
          • Ross Lake Overlook
          • Gorge Creek Falls Overlook
          • Trails for day use only
          • Hozomeen (US day access only via non-vehicle transportation, international border gate closed through 6/21)
          • All boat ramps and associated water on Diablo Lake, Gorge Lake, and the Skagit River
        • Closed
          • Hozomeen international border gate
          • All campgrounds
          • All backcountry campsites
          • All visitor and wilderness information centers
    • Olympic National Park
      • Open
        • Lake Crescent area for day use
          • Includes Barnes Point area (Marymere Falls and Moments in Time trailhead access)
          • Storm King boat launch
          • Bovee’s Meadow, La Poel and East Beach picnic areas
        • Sol Duc Road for day use
        • Heart O’ the Forest Trail in Heart O’ the Hills area
        • Staircase area for day use
        • North Shore Road in Quinault
        • Sol Duc Resort (takeout food service only, all tours and activities in park suspended)
        • Lake Crescent Lodge (takeout food service only, all tours and activities in park suspended)
        • Lake Quinault Lodge (takeout food service only, all tours and activities in park suspended)
      • Closed
        • All coastal areas
          • Includes all parking areas, trails, beaches and facilities at Kalaloch, Mora, and Ozette
        • Park roads not impacted by washouts or seasonal closures
          • Hurricane Ridge Road above the Heart O’ the Hills entrance station
          • Ozette Road
          • Mora Road
          • Upper Hoh Road
          • Lower and Upper Queets roads
          • North Fork and Graves Creek roads in the Quinault Valley
          • Other roads not mentioned as being open or closed are impacted by washouts or seasonal closures and are closed as well
        • All overnight camping, including in wilderness
          • To make changes to or cancel existing wilderness permit reservations affected by this closure, please contact the Wilderness Information Center at 360-565-3100 (Option 4) or email Olym_WIC@nps.gov
        • All public facilities closed
        • Kalaloch Lodge, Creekside Restaurant and the Mercantile closed until 6/12 at earliest
        • Log Cabin Resort closed until 6/12 at earliest
    • San Juan Island National Historical Park
      • American Camp Visitor Center area closed due to new visitor center construction
      • Restrooms at English Camp parking lot and South Beach picnic area closed
    • Whitman Mission National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Parking Lot and Picnic Area closed to vehicles
  • Washington, DC
    • National Capital Parks East
      • Varies; indoor sites closed and programs suspended.
      • Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens Visitor Center closed. Ranger programs suspended.
      • NCPE Headquarters closed
      • All Anacostia Park playgrounds closed
      • All Anacostia Park restrooms and comfort stations closed
      • All Capitol Hill Parks playgrounds closed
    • National Mall and Memorial Parks
      • All restrooms on the National Mall are closed until further notice
      • All parking south of Independence Avenue SW is closed indefinitely, including Parking Lots A, B and C on Ohio Drive SW, the Tidal Basin Parking Lot, and street parking on Ohio Drive in East Potomac Park
      • Ohio Drive SW through West Potomac Park (between 23rd Street SW and Inlet Bridge) is thru traffic only. Parking and stopping is not permitted
      • Ohio Drive SW past East Potomac Park Golf Course to Haines Point is closed to all traffic (including vehicular, pedestrian and bicycles).
      • All permits and reservations for events scheduled indefinitely have been cancelled. New applications will not be accepted for demonstrations, special events, or park site reservations scheduled indefinitely
      • All athletic fields and volleyball courts are closed until further notice. The 2020 softball lottery and athletic season is postponed until further notice.
      • All concession operations are closed until further notice
        • Big Bus sightseeing tours
        • East Potomac Tennis Center
        • Tidal Basin paddle boats
        • Food & beverage kiosks
        • Retail stores
      • Ranger programming suspended
    • Pennsylvania Avenue National Historical Site
      • Old Post Office Tower closed
    • President’s Park
      • Visitor Center closed and White House tours suspended
    • Rock Creek Park
      • Nature Center closed
      • Horse Center closed
      • Pierce Mill/Barn closed
      • Old Stone House closed
      • Tennis Center closed
      • Thompson Boathouse closed
      • All playgrounds and exercise equipment closed
      • All ranger programs suspended and cancelled
      • Planetarium programs suspended
      • Park fountains temporarily closed (Meridian Hill Park, Georgetown Waterfront Park, Chevy Chase Circle, Kahlil Gibran Memorial Garden)
    • Theodore Roosevelt Island
      • No restrooms available; parking lot closed
  • West Virginia
    • Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (nb: Potomac footbridge closed due to derailment)
      • Parking lots closed
      • All park buildings closed
      • Park restrooms closed
    • New River Gorge National River
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Campgrounds and restrooms closed
    • Gauley River National Recreation Area
      • Gauley Tailwaters Campground closed indefinitely
  • Wisconsin
    • St Croix National Scenic Riverway
      • St Croix River Visitor Center in St Croix Falls, WI remains closed
      • Namekagon River Visitor Center in Trego, WI closed indefinitely
      • Fairy Falls Day Use Area Closed
  • Wyoming
    • Devils Tower National Monument
      • Park roads open
      • Park trails open
      • Rock climbing open
      • Picnic area open
      • Visitor Center closed
      • Campground closed
    • Fort Laramie National Historic Site
      • Visitor Center, restrooms, and all historic buildings closed indefinitely
    • Fossil Butte National Monument
      • Visitor Center closed indefinitely
    • Grand Teton National Park
      • Reopened Monday 5/18
      • Park waters and marinas are closed
      • Backcountry camping not allowed at this time
      • Road access limitations
        • Hwy 26/89/191
        • Teton Park Road
        • Moose Wilson Road
        • Antelope Flats
        • Kelly Road
        • East Boundary Roads
      • Closed roads
        • Signal Mountain Summit
        • Spaulding Bay
        • RKO
        • Bar BC
        • Pilgrim Creek
        • Two Ocean
        • UW – NPS Research Station
        • Schwabacher Landing
        • Deadman’s
        • Cattleman’s
        • Laurence Rockefeller Preserve access road
        • Grassy Lake road
      • All other roads closed due to weather conditions
      • Jackson Lake Lodge and Jenny Lake Lodge areas closed and gated
    • Yellowstone National Park
      • Wyoming entrances open
      • Lower Loop open, allowing access to Lake, Canyon, Norris, Old Faithful, West Thumb and Grant Village
Sipapu Bridge, Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah

UNAFFECTED

  • Alaska
    • Alagnak Wild River
    • Aniakchak National Preserve
    • Aniakchak National Monument
    • Denali National Preserve
    • Glacier Bay National Preserve
    • Katmai National Preserve
    • Lake Clark National Preserve
    • Sitka National Historical Park
    • Wrangell-St Elias National Preserve
  • Arizona
    • Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument
  • California
    • Castle Mountains National Monument
    • Devils Postpile National Monument (seasonal closure)
    • Tule Lake National Monument
  • Colorado
    • Yucca House National Monument
  • Hawaii
    • Honouliuli National Historic Site
  • Idaho
    • City of Rocks National Reserve
  • Kansas
    • Brown vs. Board of Education National Historic Site – (6/22)
  • Louisiana
    • Poverty Point National Monument
  • Massachusetts
    • Blackstone River Valley National Historic Park
    • John F. Kennedy National Historic Site (closed until 2021)
    • Saugus Iron Works National Historic Site (no visitor services 11/1-6/1)
  • Michigan
    • Keweenaw National Historical Park (seasonal closure)
  • Mississippi
    • Brices Cross Roads National Battlefield Site
    • Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail
    • Tupelo National Battlefield
  • Nevada
    • Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument
  • New Hampshire
    • Saint-Gaudens National Historical Park
  • New Mexico
    • Valles Caldera National Preserve
  • New Jersey
    • Great Egg Harbor Scenic and Recreational River
  • New York
    • Governors Island National Monument (seasonal closure)
    • Stonewall National Monument
    • Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River
    • Middle Delaware National Scenic River
  • Texas
    • San Antonio Missions National Historical Park
  • Utah
    • Timpanogos Cave National Monument (seasonal closure)
  • Vermont
    • Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park
  • Virgin Islands
    • Salt River Bay National Historical Park & Ecological Preserve (closed due to impacts from Hurricane Maria)
    • Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument
  • Washington
    • Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area
  • Washington, DC
    • Constitution Gardens
    • FDR Memorial
    • Korean War Veterans Memorial
    • LBJ Grove on the Potomac
    • Lincoln Memorial
    • Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial
    • Thomas Jefferson Memorial
    • Vietnam Veterans Memorial
    • World War II Memorial
    • Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail (Visitor Centers on C&O Canal portion closed)
  • West Virginia
    • Bluestone National Scenic River

AFFILIATED/SUBSIDIARY AREAS AFFECTED

  • Maryland
    • Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail – offices closed until further notice
    • Chesapeake Bay offices closed
    • Oxon Cove Park/Oxon Hill Farm – Visitor Center closed
  • Northern Marianas Islands
    • American Memorial Park – Visitor Center closed
  • New York
    • Lower East Side Tenement Museum National Historic Site – Closed
    • Thomas Cole National Historic Site – Closed
  • Oklahoma
    • Oklahoma City National Memorial – NPS office closed
  • Pennsylvania
    • Gloria Dei Church National Historic Site – Closed
    • Touro Synagogue National Historic Site – Closed
  • Virginia
    • Great Falls Park – Visitor Center closed; parking adaptively managed
  • Washington
    • Wing Lake Museum – Closed indefinitely
  • Washington, DC
    • Anacostia Park – All playgrounds, restrooms, and comfort stations closed
    • Capitol Hill Parks – Playgrounds closed
    • Fort Dupont Park – Ice rink closed; programs suspended
    • Fort Circle Parks – Programs suspended
    • World War I Memorial – Ranger programming/contacts limited or suspended

AFFILIATED/SUBSIDIARY AREAS UNAFFECTED

  • Aleutian Islands WWII National Heritage Area
  • Inupiat Heritage Center
  • Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail – trail open; sites likely impacted
  • Old Spanish National Historic Trail – trail open, but sites may be affected
  • Trail of Tears National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • California National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Pony Express National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Santa Fe National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • New England National Scenic Trail
  • Last Green Valley National Heritage Corridor
  • Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail
  • Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area
  • Augusta Canal National Heritage Area
  • Gullah/Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor
  • Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Oregon National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Atchafalaya National Heritage Area
  • Cane River National Heritage Area
  • El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Maine Acadian Culture
  • Roosevelt Campobello International Park (house closed seasonally, grounds open)
  • Baltimore National Heritage Area
  • Baltimore-Washington Parkway
  • Harmony Hall
  • Star Spangled Banner National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Essex National Heritage Area
  • John H. Chafee Blackstone River Corridor
  • Motor Cities National Heritage Area
  • North Country National Scenic Trail
  • Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area
  • Mississippi Gulf National Heritage Area
  • Mississippi Hills National Heritage Area
  • Crossroads of the American Revolution National Heritage Area
  • Lower Delaware National Wild & Scenic River
  • New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve
  • El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected
  • Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor
  • Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area
  • Blue Ridge National Heritage Area
  • Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail – trail open but sites may be affected. Overmountain Shelter closed (reason unspecified)
  • David Berger National Memorial
  • Fallen Timbers Battlefield and Fort Miamis
  • Dayton Aviation Heritage Area
  • Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor
  • Oil Region National Heritage Area
  • Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area
  • Schuylkill River Valley National Heritage Area
  • South Carolina National Heritage Corridor
  • Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area
  • Cape Henry Memorial. (Part of Colonial National Historical Park)
  • Green Springs National Historic Landmark District
  • African American Civil War Memorial
  • Coal National Heritage Area
  • Wheeling National Heritage Area
  • Ice Age National Scenic Trail (admin office closed)

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 49: Whiterock Mesa

Departing Polk Spring, the trail continues to provide magnificent views of the northern Mazatzal Mountains and the neighboring Red Hills as it descends to the East Verde River. The trail will pass through both mountain ranges – first the Red Hills, then the Mazatzals. The origin of the name “Mazatzal” is unclear, though one possible meaning is a Nahuatl term meaning “place of the deer.” The Mazatzal Wilderness, which the trail will remain within now until just shy of Strawberry in the central Mazatzals, is about 390 square miles in size. It was one of the original Wilderness Areas designated upon the passage of the Wilderness Act in 1964.

Arizona Trail, Passage 25: Whiterock Mesa, Part 2

I got started around 10, heading down Passage 25 toward the East Verde River.
I hike through a gate and enter the Mazatzal Wilderness. Following cairns, the surface alternates between the basalt and more dirt – like walking through a wash. As the trail skirts the rim briefly, a magnificent view of the Mazatzal Mountains and Red Hills opens up to the hiker, then the trail experiences yet another spectacular sunset as it and the backpacker fall off the Mesa to Polk Spring near the East Verde River.

Pink ribbons spread across the bluish/purple sky at sunset

Fossil Springs Wilderness – FR 708

Take a virtual hike through the Fossil Creek Wilderness! Fossil Creek Wilderness is one of the most spectacular areas in Arizona – so much so that permits are required from April 1-October 1. From the Fossil Creek Bridge trailhead, FR 708 begins to climb the wall of Fossil Canyon. A short distance up, the road is gated. Just on the other side is the trailhead for the Waterfall Trail, one of the most popular spots in the wilderness.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Fossil Springs Wilderness – Waterfall Trail

Take a virtual hike through the Fossil Creek Wilderness! Fossil Creek Wilderness is one of the most spectacular areas in Arizona – so much so that permits are required from April 1-October 1. From the Fossil Creek Bridge trailhead, FR 708 begins to climb the wall of Fossil Canyon. A short distance up, the road is gated. Just on the other side is the trailhead for the Waterfall Trail, one of the most popular spots in the wilderness.

Fossil Springs Wilderness – Fossil Springs Trail

Take a virtual hike through the Fossil Creek Wilderness! Fossil Creek Wilderness is one of the most spectacular areas in Arizona – so much so that permits are required from April 1-October 1. The Wilderness has 11,550 acres with 30 species of trees and shrubs and over 100 species of birds. Fossil Creek itself is one of two Wild & Scenic Rivers in Arizona as well, designated by Congress in 2009 after the Fossil Springs Dam was decommissioned by Arizona in 2005. Fossil Springs, the source of the creek, release 30 million gallons of water per day, incredibly prolific for its location in Arizona.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 46 – Passage 26 (Hardscrabble Mesa)

I finally get off around 11:30 & run into Matt and a female friend near East Tank. I’m glad for the company and we walk together for a while. The road condition is terrible – lots of loose basalt – and the going is slow. I finally reach the split to Strawberry and encounter them again, and their friend who picked them up flags me down and brings me a beer. Some more trail magic! I think my biggest challenges are becoming the pack weight and the solitude. I head for a short side trip to Fossil Creek.

Arizona Trail, Day 45 – Passage 25 (Whiterock Mesa)

The trail first rolls through the pines and passes Pine Creek (dry) and Bradshaw Tank on its way to the top of Hardscrabble Mesa, which provides an excellent overlook of Oak Spring Canyon, the highlight of the passage, before dropping to the bottom. Like on the Highline, foliage still lingers in the warmer Canyon. I also spot some cool geology in what appears to be dikes in some of the rocks.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 43, Part III – Passage 27 (Highline)

The Arizona Trail following the Highline continues its route around Milk Ranch Point, passing some artifacts – perhaps ranching or mining related, as many seem to be in Arizona. Magnificent views to the south are common, with the Mazatzal Mountains an ever-increasing sight to the southeast.

Arizona Trail, Day 43, Part II – Passage 27 (Highline)

Having filled up on water and eaten lunch, the trail ascends from Webber Creek and the Geronimo Trailhead toward Milk Ranch Point, jutting out from the Mogollon Rim. This is a much more consistently wooded & shaded stretch that appears to have been spared by the Dude Fire of 1990 and February Fire (2006). It also seems to be wetter here – there are still touches of green in the ferns as the trail ascends. Gamble oaks, maple and ponderosa dominate the trail through this stretch, and the light filtering through the canopy and the leaves is magical.

Arizona Trail, Day 42-43, Part I – Passage 27 (Highline)

The trail continues to roll across the eroded foothills of the Mogollon Rim, the impressive and distinctive southern boundary of the Colorado Plateau, where the elevation jumps around 4000 ft in elevation. The Highline continues to define itself as a diverse landscape where the species of the desert below and the pine forests above mingle.

The Mazatzal Mountains – the next major hurdle once I make it to Pine – loom in the distance as well, and ironwood line the more open stretches of path across the Highline, where the Dude Fire burned the forest in 1990,

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 41 – Passage 27 (Highline), Part 3

The Arizona Trail continues west toward Pine, curving around parts of the Mogollon Rim that reach out, and segments that sit farther back, rolling across the eroded foothills beneath the parapets that’s tower overhead. The diverse plants continue to amaze. How often do you find blue spruce growing next to agave cactus!

Arizona Trail, Day 41 – Passage 27 (Highline), Part 2

Arizona Trail, Day 41 – Passage 27 (Highline), Part 2

Magnificent views of the Mogollon Rim and one of the most ecologically diverse stretches of trail to date, this entry covers from the Washington Park Trailhead across the Highline National Recreation Trail.

Arizona Trail, Day 41 – Passage 27 (Highline)

It’s another chilly morning, camped directly on the Mogollon Rim. I’ll be dropping several thousand feet today to the base of the Rim, completing the long traverse of the Coconino National Forest and entering the Tonto National Forest with views that are nothing short of spectacular.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 40 – Passage 28 (Blue Ridge)

Managed to push through the entire Blue Ridge Passage today, one of my best days on the trail. I left the Blue Ridge Ranger Station this morning and headed south for the Rim. Saw a herd of elk near the Blue Ridge Campground and Elk Tank while climbing Blue Ridge itself. The trail also passed through an active prescribed burn, though it was low intensity so probably not considered a public hazard at this point. I’m familiar with them anyway, having worked as a PIO (public informations officer) on one over the summer at Grand Canyon. The trail crossed Blue Ridge and dipped across the steep valley of East Clear Creek, dry at the crossing.

Arizona Trail, Day 39 – Passage 28 (Blue Ridge), Part 2

The trail crossed Blue Ridge and dipped across the steep valley of East Clear Creek, dry at the crossing. I was told that there may be water in one direction near the crossing but didn’t need it and therefore didn’t check. Climbing out the other side, the northern aspect of the slope is apparent – while ponderosas covered the southern slope opposite, the northern one featured Douglas fir and blue spruce. Obviously the different sides show different microclimates depending on the sun aspect, the temperature and moisture levels on each side given the orientation and angle of the slope. The trail rises back to the ponderosa forests on the Mogollon Plateau and traverses them, the site of my first human sighting in 3 days, then reaches General Springs Canyon. Dipping into General Springs Canyon, silence and quiet take hold. I passed a nice campsite near the end of GSC, but the pools nearby were still frozen at the end of the day, suggesting it would get colder in the canyon overnight (and that solar exposure during the day was limited) than on the Rim, so I continued forward to the rim itself. Lights can be seen in the distance, but I’m not sure which town. Likely Pine or Strawberry. Tomorrow begins the descent off the rim at long last.

Arizona Trail, Day 36 – Passage 29 (Happy Jack)

The low last night was projected to be 12º, the coldest night yet on the trail, and I would say that may well have been accurate. Fortunately I came prepared for such conditions. Today I will be one of the first to walk the full new Happy Jack passage routing south of Shuff Tank.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 35 – Passage 29 (Happy Jack)

It is brutally cold this morning, making it hard to even move much before 11. I believe it was around 20 at 9:00. Packing is a slow process in these temperatures. But, I pick up a few things that might make future packings faster in these temperatures, like doing most of it inside the tent at first and having a solid plan in advance to minimize time spent debating with oneself in the cold. Once packed, I head east along the forest road until coming to a trail crossing. There is a problem; the trail crosses on both sides. Clearly I missed a turnoff in the twilight yesterday evening. In both my purist nature and out of curiosity to see just where I made a wrong turn, I take the trail to the right, and it winds through the ponderosas back to Shuff Tank. It is clearly new, so this must be part of the new reroute, which has gone around the road stretch that I walked to get to the junction earlier. Instead of following the road on the north side of the tank, the trail now follows a singletrack around the west and south sides of the tank, then crosses the road on the east.

Arizona Trail, Day 34 – Passage 30 (Mormon Lake), Day 3

It’s brutally cold this morning, notably because of the strong wind that whips across the clearing to the west. Not setting up the tent last night was a mistake. I ultimately fill up for the last time at Navajo Spring and run into a few dayhikers who have completed over 300 miles of the trail themselves. Two of them are the Grouper and the Oracle. I continue south, aiming for Gooseberry Springs TH and Passage 29, Happy Jack.

Arizona Trail, Day 33 – Mormon Lake Zero

It’s cold and raw after the rain the night before. I walk about 3 miles up the road to Double Springs and then use the AZT to get back to my prior campsite to grab the sleeping pad, then retrace my steps again. Did it hail up here?

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 32 – Double Springs to Mormon Lake (Passage 30, Mormon Lake)

Heading south the trail passes an overlook of the ridges and of Mormon Lake itself, Arizona’s largest natural lake. It’s low (it often dries up under drought conditions to become Mormon Meadow) but the spring was wet enough that it hasn’t disappeared. It’s so windy that I’m almost blown off the overlook and my glasses ARE blown off (thankfully I catch them before they fall).

Arizona Trail, Day 31 – Anderson Mesa to Double Springs (Passages 30, Mormon Lake)

There is a lot of cool railroad history west of Lake Mary Road, the trail follows an old logging railroad grade for much of the route and in places the ties are still visible. Very cool. The forest turns into a dense mixed conifer and I have a chance encounter with a mountain biker named Chris who recently moved here from Idaho. We talk about the trail ahead and some I’m looking at doing in Idaho.

Coronavirus and National Parks: All COVID-19 Impacts and Park Reopenings

Another period of big updates across the National Park System.

Here we will look at the status of all 500+ national parks and affiliates, see which have changed status or will soon, and look at the details of what is or is not currently available at each park.

Disclaimer: please observe all CDC recommendations for the safety of staff and visitors alike. They are there to help and serve you, please do them the courtesy of helping keep them safe.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 30 – Anderson Mesa (Passages 31 and 30, Walnut Canyon and Mormon Lake)

The trail reaches Lowell Observatory’s Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI). The NPOI measures precise relative positions of stars in the sky for the Naval Observatory to use as reference when determining geographic positions of locations on both Earth and in space, as well as for use in timekeeping. Over four football fields long, it uses a six-mirror array directing multiple light beams from a star to a single point, enhancing image detail and separating stars that are so close that even the largest conventional telescopes cannot separate them visually. Near the NPOI is an excellent view of Upper Lake Mary in the valley of Walnut Creek below, after which the trail continues across Anderson Mesa.

After reaching Horse Lake, I make camp for the night. The sky is black as coal and the night is filled with coyotes howling.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail Thruhike, Day 26: Passage 31 (Walnut Canyon), Part 2 (Arizona/Utah Day 33)

The ponderosas are dense throughout, and their reddish bark glows in the light that filters through the green needles. The gambel oaks continue to impress along the route as well, adding splashes of yellow, red, and orange to the green ponderosa woodlands. The trail crosses two spur trails leading to overlooks with more magnificent views of the canyon.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 26: Passage 31 – Walnut Canyon (Arizona/Utah Day 33)

The trail crosses FR 303, Old Walnut Canyon Road, and heads west toward Flagstaff. Rolling in and out of drainages, It traces the rim of Walnut Canyon in places, and veers away into the woods in others. Heading west, the forest transitions back to the ponderosas, rolling up and down through drainages. The ponderosas are dense throughout, and their reddish bark glows in the light that filters through the green needles. The gambel oaks continue to impress along the route as well, adding splashes of yellow, red, and orange to the green ponderosa woodlands. The trail crosses two spur trails leading to overlooks with more magnificent views of the canyon. Both well worth the minor extra mileage and time.

Arizona Trail: Walnut Canyon National Monument, Part 4

Wrapping up at Walnut Canyon National Monument. After wrapping up the fantastic Island Trail, the Rim Trail yields some great sites as well, including an unexcavated site and several pueblos. The views of the canyon itself are pretty amazing too.

Arizona Trail, Day 26: Walnut Canyon National Monument, Part 3

This morning starts with a stop at my last national park in northern Arizona, Walnut Canyon National Monument. Walnut Canyon National Monument protects over 80 cliff dwellings of the Northern Sinagua people. Named for the historic Spanish name for the general region, Sierra de Sin Agua, or “mountains without water,” the Sinagua people built the dwellings between 1125 and 1250 CE. The dwellings are, as the name suggests, located in Walnut Canyon, a 20 mile long, 400 ft deep and quarter mile wide canyon carved by Walnut Creek in the Mogollon Plateau southeast of Flagstaff.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 26: Walnut Canyon National Monument, Part 2

Walnut Canyon National Monument, one of 420 national parks in the National Park System, protects over 80 cliff dwellings of the Northern Sinagua people. Named for the historic Spanish name for the general region, Sierra de Sin Agua, or “mountains without water,” the Sinagua people built the dwellings between 1125 and 1250 CE. The dwellings are, as the name suggests, located in Walnut Canyon, a 20 mile long, 400 ft deep and quarter mile wide canyon carved by Walnut Creek in the Mogollon Plateau southeast of Flagstaff.

Arizona Trail, Day 26: Walnut Canyon National Monument, Part I

Walnut Canyon National Monument protects over 80 cliff dwellings of the Northern Sinagua people. Named for the historic Spanish name for the general region, Sierra de Sin Agua, or “mountains without water,” the Sinagua people built the dwellings between 1125 and 1250 CE. The dwellings are, as the name suggests, located in Walnut Canyon, a 20 mile long, 400 ft deep and quarter mile wide canyon carved by Walnut Creek in the Mogollon Plateau southeast of Flagstaff.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 24: Elden Mountain, Part 3 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 31)

Welcome back to Aspen’s Tracks, thruhiking the Arizona Trail from Utah to Mexico. I want to note that this hike was completed before the coronavirus pandemic arrived, but it has left me with quite a bit of time in quarantine to write up my experiences on the trail. Exiting the shadow of Elden Mountain, I … Continue reading Arizona Trail, Day 24: Elden Mountain, Part 3 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 31)

Arizona Trail, Day 24: Elden Mountain, Part 2 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 31)

The Arizona Trail wraps past golden oaks and aspens through Schultz Pass and innumerable drainages, then opens out to areas potentially impacted by the 1977 Radio Fire. Hiking on, the trail skirts Little Elden Mountain. Views of Elden Mountain open up, and I hike across 89 through a tunnel, entering the Painted Canyon Preserve. Sunset clouds glow in the sky as I hike south.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 24: Elden Mountain (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 30)

The Arizona Trail wraps past golden oaks and aspens through Schultz Pass and innumerable drainages, then opens out to areas potentially impacted by the 1977 Radio Fire. Views of Elden Mountain open up, and I hike across US-89 through a tunnel, entering the Painted Canyon Preserve. Sunset clouds glow in the sky as I continue hiking south.

Arizona Trail, Day 23: Flagstaff Zero (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 30)

Today is going to be a busy off day. I start it with a stop at Macy’s European Coffeehouse, an awesome breakfast place in downtown Flagstaff. They make particularly great waffles, but given the hiker hunger that all thruhikers suffer from, I add a smoothie and a breakfast sandwich for good measure today. I always make a point to stop here when I’m in Flag.

Arizona Trail, Day 22: Flagstaff, Part 3 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 28)

The trail crosses to the flanks of Elden Mountain and continues to drop down toward Flagstaff. It crosses the Coconino National Forest border onto McMillan Mesa and into Buffalo Park, managed by Flagstaff. A wide rice grass meadow composes much of the park, crisscrossed with wide paths providing magnificent views of the San Francisco Peaks. Just magnificent, especially seen now in the late afternoon.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 22: Flagstaff, Part 2 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 28)

The gambel oaks are glorious with the light passing through the leaves, and the views of Elden Mountain – the other side of which was “apocalyptically burned” in the 1970s Radio Fire, according to my AZT guidebook – are spectacular. Mule deer graze among the rice grass and trees. The gambel oaks continue to look incredible. It’s amazing how as I progress south I seem to be seeing the progression of the foliage across different tree species as well as within the species. Makes for an ever changing and spectacular color display.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 21, Part 2: Heart of the San Francisco Peaks (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 27)

The Arizona Trail continues through massive groves of mature aspen and across rice grass meadows below the San Francisco Peaks. Contouring around below Humphreys and Agassiz Peaks, the two highest in Arizona, the view of the Peaks themselves and the western San Francisco Volcanic Field, over to Kendrick Peak and Bill Williams Mountain near Williams, is wide-open and magnificent.

Arizona Trail, Day 21: Heart of the San Francisco Peaks (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 27)

As the trail ascends again to traverse the mountain flank, the ponderosas transition further to aspens and mixed conifer forest again. These seem to be slightly past peak in places, but many are still quite magnificent. The trail passes through mature forest and rice grass meadows as it contours along the lower slopes of the mountains below Humphreys and Agassiz Peaks, the two highest peaks in Arizona. The weather is perfect, and the aspen leaves glow in the high elevation light. I’ll let some of their beauty again speak for themselves here, before continuing on in the next entry.

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 18: Passage 35, Babbitt Ranch (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 24)

Well, I’ve officially found my least favorite part of the trail so far. The first 5 miles today from Moqui Stage Station to the border of the Kaibab National Forest are nice…and then the views disappear and a long roadwalk down a valley begins where one crosses into the Babbit Ranch Passage (Passage 35). The … Continue reading Arizona Trail, Day 18: Passage 35, Babbitt Ranch (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 24)

Arizona Trail, Day 17: Passage 36, Coconino Rim (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 23)

Today began with a continuation of the southward trek along the Coconino Rim. The rolling hike along the rim of the Coconino Plateau passes through a combination of ponderosas and, through the trees, views off the plateau toward the Navajo Nation. As the trail rises slowly back to the top of the rim and heads … Continue reading Arizona Trail, Day 17: Passage 36, Coconino Rim (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 23)

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 15: Passage 37, Grand Canyon South Rim (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Days 21)

Unfortunately, I feel like the past few days off have broken my rhythm in terms of mileage. I spent last night with some friends on the South Rim before returning to camp for the night. Unfortunately, it seems I left my wallet at Maswik when I stopped there for dinner. So I’m up early, and … Continue reading Arizona Trail, Day 15: Passage 37, Grand Canyon South Rim (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Days 21)

The Arizona Trail Day 9 – Passage 39, Grand Canyon Inner Canyon (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 16)

the trail reaches the Kaibab Bridge, or Black Bridge, over the Colorado River. A 440 ft suspension bridge, it is the crossing for all mule trips from the South Rim to Phantom Ranch, and along with the Silver Bridge downstream (visible from the Kaibab Bridge) it is one of only two crossings between the Navajo Bridge at Lee’s Ferry and Hoover Dam.

The river itself, unlike when I departed from Lee’s Ferry, is a deep brown today due to rain upstream. At such times, the river takes on its natural brown color, which in fact was what led to its name – “Rio Colorado,” meaning “colored river” or “red river” in Spanish. It’s refreshing to see it as it was seen for all of history before the construction of Glen Canyon Dam in the 1960s. 

In stark contrast to the North Rim at around 8800 ft, the Colorado at Phantom is only around 2500 ft, or around the same elevation as Phoenix, so the weather it experiences is more akin to Central Arizona valleys than it is the rims of the Canyon. A hike through Grand Canyon crosses between 5-8 ecosystems, depending of where the precise boundaries are drawn, and can be like hiking from Mexico to Canada from an ecological perspective. Below the rim, one passes through the riparian zone along the river, the Lower Sonoran Desert, Upper Sonoran Desert. The North Rim features ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests, and the South Rim ponderosa pine and pinyon-juniper forest.

Passing through a brief tunnel on the south bank, the trail quickly ascends around 1500 ft to The Tipoff on the edge of the Tonto Platform, the rim of the Inner Canyon. During this climb, I am treated to some great views of river trips launching again after having lunch at Phantom Ranch. The trail crosses the Tonto Platform and begins to climb toward Skeleton Point, through sections of the South Kaibab with colorful names such as the “Red & Whites,” and with outstanding views of the formations and scale of the canyon.

The Arizona Trail, Day 8: Passage 38, Grand Canyon Inner Canyon, Part 1 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Day 15)

Grabbed a few things at the general store on the North Rim of Grand Canyon today, then packed up camp. The park has a number of special sites at the campground, available first-come, first-served, to those who hike or bike into the park. I then proceed over to the Backcountry Information Center, and get put … Continue reading The Arizona Trail, Day 8: Passage 38, Grand Canyon Inner Canyon, Part 1 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Day 15)

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 7, Part II: Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Part I (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 14)

To the south lies the San Francisco volcanic field, topped by the majestic San Francisco Peaks rising above. I’ll go into it in more detail as I approach them, but for now I’ll note that were it not for the canyon, the Peaks would be the most famous geological feature in Arizona. Humphreys Peak, the highest point, stands at 12,633 feet. The Arizona Trail will reach and wrap directly around their flank on the journey south. The city of Flagstaff lies immediately beyond, at the foot of the mountain on the south side. Through the trees one can make out the rim of the canyon, but the dominant view in the foreground is the aspen foliage mixed with spruce/fir and ponderosa forest. Grand Canyon National Park fills the foreground with aspen foliage mixed with spruce/fir and ponderosa forest. Heading back down the road, I head west on the AZT to the park entrance and then south through the aspens toward the Rim.

The Arizona Trail, Day 6: Passage 40, Kaibab Plateau South, Part I

I’m on the trail early. As I noted in an earlier entry, one of the perils of combining being a seasonal ranger and thruhiking in the offseason (or shoulder seasons) is that one must make oneself available for interviews in sometimes inconvenient times or places. I owe a park a return call at some point … Continue reading The Arizona Trail, Day 6: Passage 40, Kaibab Plateau South, Part I

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
The Lower Falls of the Yellowstone River, as viewed from Uncle Tom’s Trail on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone below the Falls. At 308 ft high, the Lower Falls are almost 2x the height of Niagara Falls, and the largest volume waterfall in the Rocky Mountains in the United States.  Flow rates vary from 680 cu ft/s in fall to 8400 cu ft/s in the spring runoff. The falls are located where a hard rhyolite lava flow meets a more glassy one that has been fractured and is more easily eroded. Yellowstone NP is the oldest national park in US & world, & the 2nd largest national park in the Lower 48 after Death Valley. Sitting on the largest volcanic system in North America (the Yellowstone Caldera) it contains 50% of the world’s hydrothermal features, & many plant and animal species.
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail, Day 20: Passage 34, San Francisco Peaks (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 26)

In the land of Arizona
Through desert heat or snow
Winds a trail for folks to follow
From Utah to Old Mexico

It’s the Arizona Trail
A pathway through the great Southwest
A diverse track through wood and stone
Your spirit it will test

Oh, sure you’ll sweat and blister
You’ll feel the miles every day
You’ll shiver at the loneliness
Your feet and seat will pay

But you’ll see moonlight on the borderlands
You’ll see stars on the Mogollon
You’ll feel the warmth of winter sun
And be thrilled straight through to bone

The aches and pains will fade away
You’ll feel renewed and whole
You’ll never be the same again
With Arizona in your soul

Along the Arizona Trail
A reverence and peace you’ll know
Through deserts, canyons, and mountains
From Utah to Old Mexico

“The Arizona Trail,” Dale R Shewalter

Slow start. I overslept by 15 minutes past sunrise, but the views atop Missouri Bill are fantastic – all the way to the North Rim, the Navajo and Hopi Nations, and the San Francisco Peaks. Small alpine plants are blooming, too.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2944.jpg
North panorama atop Missouri Bill Hill in the Coconino National Forest. View over the Navajo Nation, Hopi Mesas, and the San Francisco Volcanic Field. Center distance is the North Rim of Grand Canyon.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2947.jpg
Wildflowers atop Missouri Bill Hill in the San Francisco Volcanic Field.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2948.jpg
Wildflowers atop Missouri Bill Hill in the San Francisco Field along the Arizona Trail
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2949.jpg
West panorama from atop Missouri Bill Hill along the Arizona Trail in the Coconino National Forest, including the San Francisco Peaks and Volcanic Field.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2951.jpg
Cinder cones of the San Francisco Volcanic Field from atop Missouri Bill Hill in the Coconino National Forest
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2952.jpg
Cholla cactus on Missouri Bill Hill in the Coconino National Forest

For those who didn’t see my last post, another note about the San Francisco Peaks. They are the highest peaks in Arizona today, including Humphreys at 12633 and Agassiz at 12360 ft. They are a product of a volcanic hotspot under northern Arizona that formed what we know of today as the San Francisco Volcanic Field, a cluster of lava fields, around 600 cinder cones, and lava domes surrounding Flagstaff. The most prominent feature are the Peaks, an extinct stratovolcano complex. San Francisco Mountain erupted around 400,000 years ago in a lateral blast (think Mt St. Helens). The eruption carved a hole in the northeast side of the mountain and is estimated to have lowered the height of the mountain by approximately 6000 ft. At an estimated height around 18000 ft prior to the eruption, had the eruption not taken place it would be the highest peak in the continental United States today. The view from the top reaches into Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico at a minimum. I’m not sure if you can see the southwest corner of Colorado. The most recent eruption in the San Francisco volcanic field was Sunset Crater, now contained within Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument and probably one of the most unexpected places for many visitors in the United States where one can walk on and get a hands-on experience with lava. Sunset Crater last erupted around 1085 AD, meaning there is human documentation of the event from native people.

I head back down and south along the AZT, encountering a European couple heading nobo, fnishing what they started in the spring (apparently they bailed when they ran into a blizzard in Flagstaff in April), and yet another friendly camper. The ecosystems change again, from pinyon-juniper to sparse ponderosa. These also seem affected by dwarf mistletoe, and it’s obvious a prescribed burn or wildfire has come through.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2956.jpg
The Arizona Trail approaches the San Francisco Peaks, lit up by aspens in fall foliage on their slopes. The center of this view of the Peaks is the area that was blown out by its last eruption. Humphreys Peak on the right, 12633 ft, is the highest in Arizona. Coconino National Forest, Arizona.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2958.jpg
The Arizona Trail crosses back from pinyon-juniper into ponderosa forest in the Coconino National Forest
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2959.jpg
The Arizona Trail crosses back from pinyon-juniper into ponderosa forest in the Coconino National Forest
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2961.jpg
The Arizona Trail heads through ponderosa pines toward the San Francisco Peaks in the Coconino National Forest
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2962.jpg
Ponderosa pines amid golden rice grass along the Arizona Trail in the Coconino National Forest

A gorgeous view of the peaks with aspen on their middle flanks appears, an irressistible photo op. After a brief retracing of steps for my camp light, it is on to Kelly Tank, encountering a strung-out group of hikers from Maine, South Carolina, and Washington. We talk and fill up on water, me providing recommendations for Grand Canyon & Flagstaff.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2963.jpg
Rice grass meadows among the ponderosa pines and mighty San Francisco Peaks lit by aspens. Humphreys Peak, right, is the highest in Arizona at 12633 ft. Arizona Trail, Coconino National Forest.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2964.jpg
Rice grass meadows among the ponderosa pines and mighty San Francisco Peaks lit by aspens. Humphreys Peak (12633) is on the right, highest in Arizona. Arizona Trail, Coconino National Forest.

Then it is on through the glowing light beams through the ponderosa, on to camp among the aspens at around 8300 ft, and the discovery of the largest, most painless blister I’ve ever had. Unsurprisingly, right around a spot I’ve been trying to treat for possible fungal infection. Maybe a connection there? Also, everything around – grasses, ferns – totally browned out from the dry summer.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2965.jpg
Another skeleton, showing the harsh reality of the area despite its beauty on fall evenings.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2966.jpg
Sunset light ignites the tip of ponderosas on the lower slopes of the San Francisco Peaks.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2971.jpg
Cinder cones of the San Francisco Volcanic Field aglow in evening light. Arizona Trail, Coconino National Forest
Passage 34 – San Francisco Peaks
Trail SurfaceMixed – Dirt Road, Singletrack
Length
SeasonSpring-Fall
Potential Water SourcesKelly Tank & supply box
TrailheadsNone
ATA Rated DifficultyModerate
Logistical Information for distance hiked today
Passage 34 – San Francisco Peaks
Trail SurfaceMixed – Dirt Road & Singletrack
Length35.3 miles
SeasonSpring-Fall
Potential Water SourcesCedar Ranch
East Cedar Tank
Kelly Tank & supply box
Alfa Fia Tank
Schultz Tank
TrailheadsCedar Ranch
Arizona Snowbowl
Schultz Pass
ATA Rated DifficultyModerate
Logistical Information, full passage length

Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 5, Part III: South Kaibab Plateau (Passage 40), Part II

Toward the end of the day there is a second encounter with another thruhiker, this time with Eric, the hiker that I encountered several days ago when he was headed northbound (nobo) to Utah; he’s now headed southbound (sobo). Hiking together for a stretch, Eric and I come to a golden tree tunnel of aspens … Continue reading The Arizona Trail, Day 5, Part III: South Kaibab Plateau (Passage 40), Part II

The Arizona Trail, Day 5, Part II: Southern Kaibab Plateau (Passage 40)

Hiking south on Passage 40, the backpacker crosses Telephone Hill, where the pines and aspens offer a respite from the Kaibab winds. Dropping down the back side, the trail passes Crane Lake and proceeds south through a meadow before gradually ascending into aspens and pines once again. Aspens dominate the remainder of the route, rolling across hills hiking south toward Little Round Valley.

Advertisements
Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 4: Central Kaibab Plateau, Part III (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 11)

The trail continues through the burn scar of the 2006 Warm Fire, In between looking around at the aspens in the prior two posts, a crack opens in the tree line to the west. The first southbound view of Grand Canyon opens up in the distance. I ultimately ran out of light in the burn … Continue reading The Arizona Trail, Day 4: Central Kaibab Plateau, Part III (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 11)

The Arizona Trail, Day 3: Northern and Central Kaibab Plateau (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 10)

Continuing across the northern Kaibab today and onto the central (Passage 41). I encounter my first AZT hiker, Eric, to whom I give a great recommendation for Vermilion Cliffs – anyone who read my entries for the first week of this trek surely knows why. I also encounter some friends from Grand Canyon who were … Continue reading The Arizona Trail, Day 3: Northern and Central Kaibab Plateau (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 10)

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

The Arizona Trail Day 9 – Passage 39, Grand Canyon Inner Canyon (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 16)

Grand Canyon’s formations on the north side of the Inner Gorge around Bright Angel Canyon, as viewed from Tipoff on the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park. In the Inner Gorge, the Silver and Black Bridges can be seen, along with the mouth of Bright Angel Canyon and the creek delta, and Phantom Ranch. Formations such as Zoroaster’s Temple tower above.

Took a rare opportunity to sleep in a bit this morning. I’m familiar with the hike out from Phantom Ranch to the South Rim, even along the steeper South Kaibab Trail, so I’m relatively confident in even getting a slower start and still making it out by early evening. (Note – If I had not spent 6 months working here and accustomed to hiking here, I would not do this, so for those of you who may be considering hiking at Grand Canyon, please allow yourself plenty of time to hike out to the South Rim – ideally twice the amount of time that it took you to reach the bottom if you start from the South Rim, or about the same amount of time it took you to reach Phantom from the North Rim.). I get some breakfast at Phantom Ranch, the famous lodging within the Canyon designed by Mary Colter for the Fred Harvey Company and built at the bottom of Bright Angel Canyon just up from its junction with the Colorado River. Originally named Roosevelt Camp, Colter had the name changed to Phantom Ranch. All building materials other than rock (a prominent one, unsurprisingly) had to be hauled down by mule. Today, it is one of only two places in the United States where mail is still mailed by mule (and the cancellation stamps at the canteen proudly say so).

Around 11, I’m hiking out. The South Kaibab Trail turns east along the Colorado River from the mouth of Bright Angel Creek and passes Bright Angel Pueblo. The pueblo is 900-1000 years old, and was visited by John Wesley Powell’s 1869 Colorado River expedition, the first successful non-native attempt to raft the entire Grand Canyon.

The Kaibab Bridge from the South Kaibab Trail near Bright Angel Pueblo, Grand Canyon National Park
Bright Angel Pueblo, Grand Canyon National Park

From the Pueblo, the trail reaches the Kaibab Bridge, or Black Bridge, over the Colorado River. A 440 ft suspension bridge, it is the crossing for all mule trips from the South Rim to Phantom Ranch, and along with the Silver Bridge downstream (visible from the Kaibab Bridge) it is one of only two crossings between the Navajo Bridge at Lee’s Ferry and Hoover Dam. The construction materials for the bridge were carried down the newly constructed South Kaibab Trail in 1928, with 42 Havasupai tribesmen carrying each 1 ton, 550 ft suspension cables down the trail. The materials weighed 122 tons in total. It is a major civil engineering landmark.

Downstream view from the north side of the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River. The Boat Beach and Bright Angel Creek delta are visible in the center of the image. Walls of black Vishnu Schist with pink Zoroaster granite intrusions rise over 1000 ft above the river.
The Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River, Grand Canyon National Park
Downstream view from the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River. The Boat Beach and Bright Angel Creek delta are visible in the center of the image. Walls of black Vishnu Schist with pink Zoroaster granite intrusions rise over 1000 ft above the river.
Advertisements
Downstream view from the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River. The Boat Beach and Bright Angel Creek delta are visible in the center of the image. Walls of black Vishnu Schist with pink Zoroaster granite intrusions rise over 1000 ft above the river.
Upstream view from the Kaibab Bridge over the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, showing the cableway system that predated the bridge.
View across the Kaibab Bridge to the south side of the river, Grand Canyon National Park

Visible from the Kaibab Bridge are the Silver Bridge downstream, which the Bright Angel Trail uses to cross the river, as well as the cableway next to the bridge. The Black Bridge is the fourth crossing of the Colorado at the location. The first was a ferry, but this was extremely perilous. The second was the cableway, a 6×10 ft steel cage to carry passengers (mules and people) across the river. Theodore Roosevelt used it on a 1913 visit to then-Grand Canyon National Monument. A successor suspension bridge opened in 1920, to be succeeded by the Kaibab Bridge in 1928.

The river itself, unlike when I departed from Lee’s Ferry, is a deep brown today due to rain upstream. At such times, the river takes on its natural brown color, which in fact was what led to its name – “Rio Colorado,” meaning “colored river” or “red river” in Spanish. It’s refreshing to see it as it was seen for all of history before the construction of Glen Canyon Dam in the 1960s.

In stark contrast to the North Rim at around 8800 ft, the Colorado at Phantom is only around 2500 ft, or around the same elevation as Phoenix, so the weather it experiences is more akin to Central Arizona valleys than it is the rims of the Canyon. A hike through Grand Canyon crosses between 5-8 ecosystems, depending of where the precise boundaries are drawn, and can be like hiking from Mexico to Canada from an ecological perspective. Below the rim, one passes through the riparian zone along the river, the Lower Sonoran Desert, Upper Sonoran Desert. The North Rim features ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forests, and the South Rim ponderosa pine and pinyon-juniper forest.

Passing through a brief tunnel on the south bank, the trail quickly ascends around 1500 ft to The Tipoff on the edge of the Tonto Platform, the rim of the Inner Canyon. During this climb, I am treated to some great views of river trips launching again after having lunch at Phantom Ranch. The trail crosses the Tonto Platform and begins to climb toward Skeleton Point, through sections of the South Kaibab with colorful names such as the “Red & Whites,” and with outstanding views of the formations and scale of the canyon.

Downstream view of the Inner Canyon including the Colorado River and Bright Angel Creek delta, Grand Canyon National Park. The Silver Bridge is visible downstream.
View of the Kaibab Bridge from the South Kaibab Trail climbing out of the Inner Gorge, Grand Canyon National Park
River trip launching on the Colorado River from the Boat Beach on the Bright Angel Creek Delta near Phantom Ranch, Grand Canyon National Park
Advertisements
River trip launching on the Colorado River from the Boat Beach on the Bright Angel Creek Delta near Phantom Ranch, Grand Canyon National Park
Downstream view of the Colorado River, Inner Gorge, Bright Angel Creek delta, Bright Angel Campground, Phantom Ranch, and the Silver Bridge over the Colorado. Grand Canyon National Park.
Zoroaster Temple (the sawtooth ridge) peeks above the lip of the Inner Gorge from the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
River trip continuing downstream on the Colorado River in the Inner Gorge, as viewed from Tipoff on the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
Zoroaster Temple viewed from Tipoff on the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
Grand Canyon’s formations on the north side of the Inner Gorge around Bright Angel Canyon, as viewed from Tipoff on the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park. In the Inner Gorge, the Silver and Black Bridges can be seen, along with the mouth of Bright Angel Canyon and the creek delta, and Phantom Ranch. Formations such as Zoroaster’s Temple tower above.
North panorama centered on Zoroaster’s Temple from the South Kaibab Trail crossing the Tonto Platform, Grand Canyon National Park
Zoroaster Temple from the South Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park
Advertisements

And then everything changes.

I came around a corner below Skeleton Point, just below the Red & Whites to find someone sitting in the middle of the trail. Upon my asking if they were OK, they said no, they thought they had broken their ankle. When I asked why they thought that, they said that “I tried to stand up, and it just flops to the side.” Yes, that’s a break. I say that I can splint it, but other than that we’d have to get more help down to get her out. But I ask if they want me to use my new inReach to contact GRCA SAR and get it, which they accept. I hit the SOS button on my inReach, and a hiker behind me helps splint it using their poles and cord that I carried while I ran to Tipoff to call GRCA SAR directly. Unfortunately it was too windy for a helicopter medivac at that time, so we had to wait about 2-3 hours for a medic to reach us on the trail. We got a firm splint on the ankle and lucked out – eventually they did get a helicopter window and managed to land and take the individual down a slope to where they had landed. Ended up hiking out with the husband of the individual in question; we topped around around 9-10. I have to say, given the wind we experienced on the upper South Kaibab, I’m shocked the helicopter managed to reach us at all. The backup plan was apparently to have them spend the night near Tipoff and launch in the morning.

So glad that I opted to carry an inReach for this trip, now. I didn’t expect it to pay off so soon, but, of course, that is the nature of an emergency.

Departure of the medevac that I assisted with.

Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 2: Buckskin Mountain to Kaibab Plateau North (Arizona/Utah Day 9)

Another early start. I make it off Passage 43 (Buckskin Mountain) by mid morning and break into the northern Kaibab Plateau (Passage 42). The land shifts from BLM land at the start and enters the Kaibab National Forest south of the Passage boundary. I’m having some issues charging given the intermittent shade cast by the … Continue reading The Arizona Trail, Day 2: Buckskin Mountain to Kaibab Plateau North (Arizona/Utah Day 9)

The Arizona Trail, Day 1 (AZ/UT Day 8, Part 4)

“In the land of Arizona
Through desert heat or snow
Winds a trail for folks to follow
From Utah to Old Mexico

It’s the Arizona Trail
A pathway through the great Southwest
A diverse track through wood and stone
Your spirit it will test

Oh, sure you’ll sweat and blister
You’ll feel the miles every day
You’ll shiver at the loneliness
Your feet and seat will pay

But you’ll see moonlight on the borderlands
You’ll see stars on the Mogollon
You’ll feel the warmth of winter sun
And be thrilled straight through to bone

The aches and pains will fade away
You’ll feel renewed and whole
You’ll never be the same again
With Arizona in your soul

Along the Arizona Trail
A reverence and peace you’ll know
Through deserts, canyons, and mountains
From Utah to Old Mexico”

Arizona Trail Approach Day 8, Part 1 – Buckskin Gulch to the Arizona Trail (Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Broke camp early in Buckskin Gulch this morning and headed out. I make better time than I expect, and encounter the Dragoos from Oklahoma about 1.5 mi from Wire Pass. I’m surprised that I’m that close to the Pass, since I hadn’t expected to make it for several miles. We have breakfast together and hike … Continue reading Arizona Trail Approach Day 8, Part 1 – Buckskin Gulch to the Arizona Trail (Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness, Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail Approach Day 6: Paría Canyon and Buckskin Gulch (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

I’m running low on battery in these canyons with extremely limited solar power to recharge. The day starts with a flight of bats flying down the canyon. After that exciting start, I decide to hike up to Slide Rock and then turn around and hit Buckskin Gulch. Just past the confluence of Paría Canyon and … Continue reading Arizona Trail Approach Day 6: Paría Canyon and Buckskin Gulch (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Arizona Trail Approach Day 7: Buckskin Gulch, Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

After several hours spent trying to fill water bags and talking with a friendly BLM ranger, as well as a farewell encounter with Philip and Raj, I head up Buckskin Gulch. After dragging my pack over the boulder jam – a much more difficult undertaking than yesterday without the pack – I start up canyon … Continue reading Arizona Trail Approach Day 7: Buckskin Gulch, Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Advertisements
Advertisements

Arizona Trail Approach Day 5: Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Dawn finds me encamped at Big Springs. I get another slow start than I’d like, this time due to weather. Expecting potential rain and knowing about remnants of Tropical Storm Lorena in area, and in relatively safe spot with gear prepped for rain, I opt to wait. Flash floods are the top weather-related killer in … Continue reading Arizona Trail Approach Day 5: Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Arizona Trail Approach Day 3: Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Slow start this morning. The spring that I reached yesterday, the first on the trail, is little more than a trickle, and I have a lot of water to fill. It marks the border between the Chinle Formation and the Wingate Sandstone. As I begin to wind my way further up Paria Canyon, deeper and … Continue reading Arizona Trail Approach Day 3: Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

What is Wilderness?

As I enter the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness Area, I think that it’s important to take a moment to discuss the concept of wilderness.

The 1964 Wilderness Act, signed by President Lyndon Johnson, states “a wilderness in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape, is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.“ It was signed on September 3rd, 1964 and gives Congress the authority to create wilderness areas within public lands where things that are associated with manmade civilization – such as mechanized transportation, developed campgrounds, etc. – are prohibited and the area is allowed to remain in as natural a state as possible.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 8: Passage 38, Grand Canyon Inner Canyon, Part 1 (Trans-Arizona/Utah Day 15)

Grabbed a few things at the general store on the North Rim of Grand Canyon today, then packed up camp. The park has a number of special sites at the campground, available first-come, first-served, to those who hike or bike into the park. I then proceed over to the Backcountry Information Center, and get put on another thruhiker’s permit for Bright Angel Campground at the bottom, near the Colorado River. My pack weighs in at 46 pounds, not overly light but lighter than it has been. Obviously some of my efforts to cut weight before crossing the canyon paid off. After a side trip to see the aspens in Thompson Canyon, as recommended by the LE ranger that I spoke to yesterday, I head into the canyon.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2563.jpg
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Advertisements
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona

This is the only part of the Arizona Trail that I have solid familiarity with, having hiked from the South Rim to the North Rim and back in May. If there’s anything I know, it’s to expect the unexpected. In May I ran into rain, hail, and snow between Cottonwood and the North Rim as elevations changed. I was also delayed heading back to the South Rim the following day by several hours due to a torrential rainstorm that blew through. Fortunately, none of that materializes today. It’s still going to be warm at the bottom, but not as warm as it would have been had I started right when my season ended, and the warmth is a welcome change from the Kaibab cold of the past few nights. The trail starts 8297 ft of elevation and drops to the Colorado River at 2480 ft.

The route heads down the legendary North Kaibab Trail, past the Coconino Overlook, where I have a long conversation with a park PSAR volunteer hoping to do the trail themselves in the spring, to the Supai Tunnel, around which the grade peaks at 25%, one of the steepest on the entire AZT. Fortunately, I’m going down. By this point, I have descended through the Kaibab Limestone, Toroweap Formation, Coconino Sandstone, and into the Supai Group.

View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Coconino Overlook. Komo Point at junction of Roaring Springs and Bright Angel Canyons. South Rim can be seen in right-center, with San Francisco Peaks above. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Coconino Overlook. Komo Point at junction of Roaring Springs and Bright Angel Canyons. South Rim can be seen in right-center, with San Francisco Peaks above. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim layering above the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38. Kaibab Formation at top, sloping Toroweap, Coconino Cliffs, and sloping Hermit Shale lead down to the Supai Group.
Advertisements
View through the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible in shade, lower right of image.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible in shade, lower right of image.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible on lower right-center of image in shade.

The trail continues to descend. It enters the Redwall Limestone and drops through a series of switchbacks to the Redwall Bridge before beginning a more gradual traverse through the layer, a stretch where the trail was literally blasted out of the cliff, almost forming a half-tunnel. The trail continues through the Muav Limestone to Roaring Springs at the border with the Bright Angel Shale, the source of all of the drinking water for Grand Canyon National Park. The water from the springs is pumped to the North Rim and flows by gravity to Indian Gardens on the South Rim before being pumped to the rim itself from there. Entering Bright Angel Canyon, it passes through a segment of trail that was literally blown out of the side of the cliff by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s, the terrain was so rugged, forming a kind of half-tunnel above the trail in the side of the cliff.

View back toward Supai Tunnel from North Kaibab Trail descending into Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from north side of Redwall Bridge, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Redwall Bridge, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.
Upcanyon view of Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Redwall Bridge in lower center. NK Trailhead is located in pine forest on upper left.
North Rim from North Kaibab Trail in Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
Upcanyon view of Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Redwall Bridge in lower center. NK Trailhead is located in pine forest on upper left.
Roaring Springs, viewed from the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

View down & across Roaring Springs Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Uncle Jim Point at upper left. Rim in distance is in Bright Angel Canyon.
North Kaibab Trail in Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. This section of trail, one of the most rugged and remote on the developed Corridor between the North and South Rims, was blown out of the cliff by the CCC in the 1930s.
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Advertisements

Arizona Trail Approach Day 2: Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

Today was an absolutely exhilarating day. I climbed around countless rapids and waterfalls heading up Paria Canyon further into the wilderness area in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. The soil around here can be cryptobiotic – essentially, living – so I stayed in the stream whenever possible to avoid damaging living soil. The canyon has started … Continue reading Arizona Trail Approach Day 2: Paría Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness (Vermilion Cliffs National Monument)

South Rim to Lee’s Ferry

First day description, traveling from the South Rim of Grand Canyon to Marble Canyon and Lee’s Ferry in preparation for beginning the southbound trek to Mexico.

Advertisements
Advertisements

Prologue: The Arizona Trail

I finally bit the bullet on a thruhike. Since I arrived at Grand Canyon National Park in March, I have been considering thruhiking the Arizona Trail across the state. For those who don’t know, the Arizona Trail is an 800 mile long hiking trail across Arizona. It starts at the Utah state line, skirts Buckskin … Continue reading Prologue: The Arizona Trail

The Journey Begins

Thanks for joining me! Good company in a journey makes the way seem shorter. — Izaak Walton

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Grabbed a few things at the general store on the North Rim of Grand Canyon today, then packed up camp. The park has a number of special sites at the campground, available first-come, first-served, to those who hike or bike into the park. I then proceed over to the Backcountry Information Center, and get put on another thruhiker’s permit for Bright Angel Campground at the bottom, near the Colorado River. My pack weighs in at 46 pounds, not overly light but lighter than it has been. Obviously some of my efforts to cut weight before crossing the canyon paid off. After a side trip to see the aspens in Thompson Canyon, as recommended by the LE ranger that I spoke to yesterday, I head into the canyon.

Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
Aspens in Thompson Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Coconino Overlook. Komo Point at junction of Roaring Springs and Bright Angel Canyons. South Rim can be seen in right-center, with San Francisco Peaks above. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Coconino Overlook. Komo Point at junction of Roaring Springs and Bright Angel Canyons. South Rim can be seen in right-center, with San Francisco Peaks above. Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim layering above the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38. Kaibab Formation at top, sloping Toroweap, Coconino Cliffs, and sloping Hermit Shale lead down to the Supai Group.
View through the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible in shade, lower right of image.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible in shade, lower right of image.
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from the Supai Tunnel on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Redwall Bridge visible on lower right-center of image in shade.
View back toward Supai Tunnel from North Kaibab Trail descending into Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from north side of Redwall Bridge, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
View down Roaring Springs Canyon from Redwall Bridge, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.
North Rim from North Kaibab Trail in Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park
Upcanyon view of Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Redwall Bridge in lower center. NK Trailhead is located in pine forest on upper left.
Upcanyon view of Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park. Redwall Bridge in lower center. NK Trailhead is located in pine forest on upper left.
View down & across Roaring Springs Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Uncle Jim Point at upper left. Rim in distance is in Bright Angel Canyon.
North Kaibab Trail in Roaring Springs Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. This section of trail, one of the most rugged and remote on the developed Corridor between the North and South Rims, was blown out of the cliff by the CCC in the 1930s.
Komo Point on the North Rim rises above the junction of Roaring Springs Canyon and Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, AZT Passage 38.
Roaring Springs, viewed from the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Tarantula on the North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
Bright Angel Creek from the North Kaibab Trail in upper Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Bright Angel Creek from the North Kaibab Trail in upper Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Cascade waterfall on Bright Angel Creek from the North Kaibab Trail in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View toward the junction of Bright Angel Canyon (center) and Roaring Springs Canyon (left). Komo Point to right; Uncle Jim Point on upper left. View from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
View down Bright Angel Canyon, North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Remnant transcanyon telephone line built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression. North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim in Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim in Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
North Rim in Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Crescent moon above rim of Bright Angel Canyon, North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38
Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Bright Angel Canyon from North Kaibab Trail, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.
Yes, there is still water in the desert.
Ribbon Falls, Bright Angel Canyon, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona Trail Passage 38.

The Arizona Trail, Day 7, Part II: Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park North Rim, Part I (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 14)

In the land of Arizona
Through desert heat or snow
Winds a trail for folks to follow
From Utah to Old Mexico

It’s the Arizona Trail
A pathway through the great Southwest
A diverse track through wood and stone
Your spirit it will test

Oh, sure you’ll sweat and blister
You’ll feel the miles every day
You’ll shiver at the loneliness
Your feet and seat will pay

But you’ll see moonlight on the borderlands
You’ll see stars on the Mogollon
You’ll feel the warmth of winter sun
And be thrilled straight through to bone

The aches and pains will fade away
You’ll feel renewed and whole
You’ll never be the same again
With Arizona in your soul

Along the Arizona Trail
A reverence and peace you’ll know
Through deserts, canyons, and mountains
From Utah to Old Mexico

“The Arizona Trail,” Dale R Shewalter

The North Rim lookout is located near the highest point on the entire Arizona Trail. A historical geographic marker still bearing the Forest Service name (the tower was moved to its current location inside the park in the 1930s) is beside the tower, along with a historic lookout register sign. This particular tower is also notable for a particularly famous lookout – Edward Abbey once staffed it for four years from the late 60s into the 70s. The historic guide to using the “FireFinder” system is still present in the room at the top of the lookout.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2492.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2493.jpg
North Rim Lookout geographic marker
Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2494.jpg
FireFinder instruction guide, originally from Six Rivers National Forest
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2495.jpg
Osbourne FireFinder system

Climbing to the top of the lookout, one can see the Ikes Fire actively burning to the west. Through the haze, the shadow of Mt Trumbull and other peaks in Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument can be seen.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2496.jpg
West view from North Rim Lookout Tower
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

To the south lies the San Francisco volcanic field, topped by the majestic San Francisco Peaks rising above. I’ll go into it in more detail as I approach them, but for now I’ll note that were it not for the canyon, the Peaks would be the most famous geological feature in Arizona. Humphreys Peak, the highest point, stands at 12,633 feet. The Arizona Trail will reach and wrap directly around their flank on the journey south. The city of Flagstaff lies immediately beyond, at the foot of the mountain on the south side. Through the trees one can make out the rim of the canyon, but the dominant view in the foreground is the aspen foliage mixed with spruce/fir and ponderosa forest. Grand Canyon National Park fills the foreground with aspen foliage mixed with spruce/fir and ponderosa forest. Heading back down the road, I head west on the AZT to the park entrance.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2497.jpg
San Francisco Volcanic Field from the North Rim Lookout Tower. From left to right, O’Leary Peak, the San Francisco Peaks (Humphreys Peak highest), Kendrick Peak, and Red Mountain in Coconino National Forest
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2499-1.jpg
East-South view from North Rim Lookout Tower
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2501.jpg
Aspen meadow below the North Rim Lookout Tower
Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2502.jpg
South/Southwest view from North Rim Lookout Tower
Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

The trail descends down the old road that led to the fire lookout until it reaches AZ-67 at the North Rim Entrance Station.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2505.jpg
Aspens along Lookout Road east of the North Rim Entrance Station
Arizona Trail Passage 39, Grand Canyon North Rim
Grand Canyon National Park

I check in with the ranger there, who asks if I need anything, but I’m good for now. There was water available for hikers near the station. After some slight confusion about the route leaving that area, I pick up the trail again (purist that I am, after retracing some steps, admittedly) and follow it south.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2507.jpg
Aspens on Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2508.jpg
Aspens tunnels on Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
Grand Canyon North Rim (AZT Passage 39)
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2509.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2510.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2511.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
Advertisements
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2511.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2512.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
Arizona Trail Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2513.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2514.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2516.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
Advertisements
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2517.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2518.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2519.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2520.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
Advertisements
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2522.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2521.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill

AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2524.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2526.jpg
Arizona Trail north of Lindbergh Hill
AZT Passage 39, Grand Canyon National Park
Advertisements

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 7: Passage 40, Kaibab Plateau South

In the land of Arizona
Through desert heat or snow
Winds a trail for folks to follow
From Utah to Old Mexico

It’s the Arizona Trail
A pathway through the great Southwest
A diverse track through wood and stone
Your spirit it will test

Oh, sure you’ll sweat and blister
You’ll feel the miles every day
You’ll shiver at the loneliness
Your feet and seat will pay

But you’ll see moonlight on the borderlands
You’ll see stars on the Mogollon
You’ll feel the warmth of winter sun
And be thrilled straight through to bone

The aches and pains will fade away
You’ll feel renewed and whole
You’ll never be the same again
With Arizona in your soul

Along the Arizona Trail
A reverence and peace you’ll know
Through deserts, canyons, and mountains
From Utah to Old Mexico

“The Arizona Trail,” Dale R Shewalter

Another cold morning. There are icicles in my water and some food has frozen. I’m on the trail around 7:30, in the vicinity of the highest point on the entire Arizona Trail. Setting out and hiking southward, the trail winds through meadows and past more aspen groves mixed with spruce/fir forest before crossing the unmarked highpoint of both the Kaibab and trail just before reaching the Grand Canyon National Park boundary.

This entire stretch falls within the boreal forest, between 8200-9200 ft in elevation. Accumulating 26 inches of precipitation per year, including an average of 10-12 feet of snow, and dominated by aspen and conifers such as Engelmann spruce & Douglas fir, the boreal forest on the North Rim has cool temperatures even in high summer, is the subject of extreme storms, and in named for Boreas, the North Wind.

Passage 40
Trail SurfacePrimarily dirt singletrack; some USFS roads
Length20.7 miles
SeasonAll year but road access closed November-May. Non motorized access only during that time.
Potential Water SourcesSourdough Well
Crystal Spring
Public caches
TrailheadsGrand Canyon National Park/Kaibab NF boundary (south)
Telephone Hill (north)
Various USFS road connections (midpoint), including FR 610
ATA- Rated DifficultyEasy to Moderate
Ecosystems traversedBoreal Forest
Logistical details
Hiking southbound on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall backpacking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall hiking on the AZT
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 5, Part 1: Central & South Kaibab Plateau (Passages 41 & 40)

In the land of Arizona
Through desert heat or snow
Winds a trail for folks to follow
From Utah to Old Mexico

It’s the Arizona Trail
A pathway through the great Southwest
A diverse track through wood and stone
Your spirit it will test

Oh, sure you’ll sweat and blister
You’ll feel the miles every day
You’ll shiver at the loneliness
Your feet and seat will pay

But you’ll see moonlight on the borderlands
You’ll see stars on the Mogollon
You’ll feel the warmth of winter sun
And be thrilled straight through to bone

The aches and pains will fade away
You’ll feel renewed and whole
You’ll never be the same again
With Arizona in your soul

Along the Arizona Trail
A reverence and peace you’ll know
Through deserts, canyons, and mountains
From Utah to Old Mexico

“The Arizona Trail,” Dale R Shewalter

The North Rim tried to kill me last night. I woke up at 2:45 with a frozen left big toe. I pulled my shell layer into my bag in an effort to stay warm and managed to do so. I got up around six when the sun breaks over and headed south across the burn area. The wind was brutal, continuing to blow me sideways on the trail in places. More magnificent aspen groves commenced amid the rolling plateau as the Arizona Trail heads southbound once again toward Telephone Hill. This entire stretch was impacted by the Warm Fire in 2006, leaving little shelter but allowing for the widespread aspen growth, as aspens are one of the first trees to recolonize a disturbed area after a fire. Telephone Hill provides a great vantage point over Arizona-67 reaching south through the hills and valleys of the southern Kaibab toward the North Rim of Grand Canyon, and its intact pine forest provides a welcome break from the wind that has been incessant since last night.

Statistics on the full length of Passage 41:

Passage 41Passage 40
Trail SurfaceDirt singletrackPrimarily dirt singletrack; some USFS roads
Length4.6 miles one-way (9.2 round trip)About 20.7 miles round trip
Elevation Change823 ft (gross) from Fossil Creek Bridge THApprox. 1426 ft from Bob Bear TH
SeasonAll year but trail access by road from November-May limited to 89A. Winter conditions likely to be present beginning in November.All year but road access closed November-May. Non motorized access only during that time.
Potential Water SourcesJacob Lake
Unreliable tanks; public caches.
TrailheadsTelephone Hill (south)
Various USFS road connections (midpoint)
US-89A (north)
Grand Canyon National Park/Kaibab NF boundary (south)
Telephone Hill (north)
Various USFS road connections (midpoint)
Logistical details
Relive video for today (Passage 40)
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest
Fall aspens in Warm Fire burn scar
Arizona Trail, Passage 40
Kaibab National Forest

I eventually crest Telephone Hill and reenter the forest, getting a respite from the wind before continuing south on Passage 41, the Kaibab Plateau South.

Aspen groves across Hwy 67, view from top of Telephone Hill
Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (South Kaibab Plateau)
Kaibab National Forest
Advertisements
Advertisements
Aspen groves across Hwy 67, view from top of Telephone Hill
Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (South Kaibab Plateau)
Kaibab National Forest
Ponderosa pines line the Arizona Trail on Telephone Hill, at the south end of the Warm Fire burn scar in the Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South)
Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South)
Kaibab National Forest
Aspens among pines above the AZT on Telephone Hill
Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South)
Kaibab National Forest
Aspen groves across Hwy 67, view from top of Telephone Hill
Arizona Trail, Passage 40 (Kaibab Plateau South)
Kaibab National Forest, Arizona
Advertisements
Advertisements

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements
Advertisements

The Arizona Trail, Day 4: Central Kaibab Plateau, Part III (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 11)

In the land of Arizona
Through desert heat or snow
Winds a trail for folks to follow
From Utah to Old Mexico

It’s the Arizona Trail
A pathway through the great Southwest
A diverse track through wood and stone
Your spirit it will test

Oh, sure you’ll sweat and blister
You’ll feel the miles every day
You’ll shiver at the loneliness
Your feet and seat will pay

But you’ll see moonlight on the borderlands
You’ll see stars on the Mogollon
You’ll feel the warmth of winter sun
And be thrilled straight through to bone

The aches and pains will fade away
You’ll feel renewed and whole
You’ll never be the same again
With Arizona in your soul

Along the Arizona Trail
A reverence and peace you’ll know
Through deserts, canyons, and mountains
From Utah to Old Mexico

“The Arizona Trail,” Dale R Shewalter

The trail continues through the burn scar of the 2006 Warm Fire, In between looking around at the aspens in the prior two posts, a crack opens in the tree line to the west. The first southbound view of Grand Canyon opens up in the distance.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_4316-1.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_4317-1.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_4318-1.jpg

I ultimately ran out of light in the burn scar left by the 2006 Warm Fire, and the breeze is howling again tonight. Hopefully it calms down a bit overnight. I’ve arranged my gear to make a windfence as best I can but without any substantial tree cover there’s not much that can be done. This might admittedly be a rough night. I don’t get “caught out” often but 30-50 mph wind gusts were not in the forecast when I started this trek, and most of my cold weather gear is back on the South Rim for evaluation where it will be needed from that point.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2114.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2115.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2115.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2117.jpg
Advertisements
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2118.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2119.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2120.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2121.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2122.jpg
Advertisements
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2123.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2124.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2125.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2126.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2127.jpg
Advertisements
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2128.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2129.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2130.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2131.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2132.jpg
Fire and wind impacts evident in the 2006 Warm Fire burn scar.
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2133.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2135.jpg
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2136.jpg