Fossil Springs Wilderness – FR 708

Fossil Springs Wilderness is one of the most spectacular areas in Arizona – so much so that permits are required from April 1-October 1. The Wilderness has 11,550 acres with 30 species of trees and shrubs and over 100 species of birds. Fossil Creek itself is one of two Wild & Scenic Rivers in Arizona as well, designated by Congress in 2009 after the Fossil Springs Dam was decommissioned by Arizona in 2005. The next few entries will follow the loop from the eastern Fossil Springs Trailhead through Fossil Canyon along the Flume Trail to the Fossil Creek Bridge, then returning to the start along Fossil Creek Road (FR 708) with a spur on the Waterfall Trail. I did the full loop in a day but one could easy split it into two and I’d recommend that for less experienced hikers or those who are just out for a weekend to give yourself a bit more time to soak it in. Today’s entry will cover the eastern segment of the loop, running along the Fossil Springs Trail from the Bob Bear (Fossil Springs) Trailhead 3 miles west of Strawberry to Fossil Creek Dam.

Two important things to recognize about the full loop: permits are required to park at the trailheads from April 1-October 30, and FR 708 (Fossil Creek Road) is closed from just below the Waterfall Trailhead to Just west of the Bob Bear Trailhead, so plan your starting point and route to get there in advance with that in mind and be aware it’s not easy to get from one side to the other by car. You can, however, walk or bike the closed stretch of road. It is a long, sustained climb up the canyon wall, as we’ll see tomorrow – so consider that if doing the full loop as well. Some might prefer to go down the road first and up the shorter but steeper trail at the end. Or if you started at the bottom (Fossil Creek Bridge) you could go up the road or trail first, depending on your preferred method of ascent. Just remember, again – once you go to one of the two trailheads, that’s where you’ll be starting.

General things to know about this hike before we launch in:

FR 708Fossil Creek Wilderness Loop
Trail SurfaceDirt road Dirt (75% singletrack, 25% road)
Length (Mi)About 20
Elevation Change (Ft)16251625
SeasonAll yearAll year
Potential Water SourcesFossil CreekFossil Springs
Fossil Creek
TrailheadsFossil Springs-Irving Trailhead
Waterfall Trailhead
Bob Bear Trailhead
Bob Bear Trailhead
Fossil Springs-Irving Trailhead

FR 708 continues its ascent of the walls of Fossil Canyon from the Waterfall Trailhead. The views down into the canyon are superb, and splotches of color from gamble oaks, Arizona sycamores, and more add to the spectacle. Spectacular vistas emerge as the road climbs to the canyon rim.

Fossil Canyon foliage
Fossil Springs Wilderness
Coconino National Forest
Fossil Canyon foliage
Fossil Springs Wilderness
Coconino National Forest
Fossil Canyon, upcanyon view
Fossil Springs Wilderness
Coconino National Forest
Fossil Canyon, panorama
Fossil Springs Wilderness
Coconino National Forest

I reach the top around sunset and collect my stuff. The sunset itself is spectacular, one of the best ones yet for certain, and one of the best in a while on the trail. Some people are packing up from the day, and I manage to secure a ride back to Strawberry with a recent transplant to Arizona out exploring for the day. I stopped by a good Italian place and then stop across the street at a bar that was recommended to me for having simple things like toothbrushes available. One of the waitresses there, on hearing my story, offers me a ride back to the AZT, so I’m now crashed for the night back atop Whiterock Mesa. I’ll add the details on dinner stop to my Pine entry. Tomorrow, heading toward the Mazatzals.

Sunset, Fossil Springs Wilderness
Coconino National Forest
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Sunset, Fossil Springs Wilderness
Coconino National Forest
Sunset, Fossil Springs Wilderness
Coconino National Forest

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Backpacking the Amazing Arizona Trail – Pine Mountain (Passage 21), FR 422 to Pigeon Spring Trailhead

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

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