Backpacking the Arizona Trail, Day 29 – Flagstaff to Anderson Mesa (Passages 31 & 33, Flagstaff & Walnut Canyon)

Coconino Sandstone walls in upper Walnut Canyon, Coconino National Forest (Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon)

Welcome back to Aspen’s Tracks, thruhiking the Arizona Trail from Utah to Mexico.

After doing a full resupply yesterday to get me through to Pine, where my next box has been shipped, and replacing some gear, including a new pair of boots and new sleeping pad, today started with breakfast with Oscar at Tourist Home, which I wrote about in my last post as one of the best breakfast places in Flagstaff. The weather is going to cool off again in the next few days, dipping down into the 20s overnight.

We encounter Neil Bob, another SOBO thruhiker from Seattle. He’s staying in town the next few days recovering from some IT band soreness. Oscar drops me and my 75(!) lb pack off near the Trailhead and we say goodbye. I hike down the access trail and rejoin the main Arizona Trail, then start south again.

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Arizona Trail hiking through Upper Walnut Canyon
Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
Coconino Sandstone walls in upper Walnut Canyon, view backpacking the AZT
Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest

The trail passes through Walnut Canyon, beneath towering cliffs of Coconino Sandstone tinted gray and pink and highlighted with green ponderosa pines. Finally it climbs out and passes through a reroute in a burn area. It looks like the original trail here has been intentionally covered with logs on at least one end, and the reroute is marked with flags, so I’m guessing the reroute is permanent. Just shy of Marshall Mesa Tank I run out of daylight and stop for the night. Tomorrow will start the trek across Anderson Mesa toward Mormon Lake.

Fall as seen hiking on the slopes of Walnut Canyon
Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
San Francisco Peaks from Arizona Trail backpacking out of Walnut Canyon
AZT Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
Hiking past Gambel oaks in fall on rim of Walnut Canyon
Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
Backpacking past Gambel oaks
Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
Hiking through Gambel oaks
Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
Backpacking through Gambel oaks
Arizona Trail Passage 31, Walnut Canyon
Coconino National Forest
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National Park Quest: Tonto National Monument

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

Backpacking the Amazing Arizona Trail – Inspiration Point to Roosevelt Cemetery (Passages 20 & 19, Four Peaks to Superstition Mountains)

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

Arizona Trail Backpacking Logistics – AZT Gateway Communities: Tonto Basin

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

Backpacking the Amazing Arizona Trail – Four Peaks South (Passage 20)

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

Backpacking the Amazing Arizona Trail – Four Peaks North (Passage 20)

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Four Peaks Passage to just south of Pigeon Spring. The terrain is incredibly precipitous – in places the trail seems to occupy the only level ground around. Fire impacts are present throughout as well, a legacy of the 1996 Lone Fire. Magnificent views of Roosevelt Lake, the southern Mazatzal foothills, and the Sierra Ancha across Tonto Basin.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

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Passage 31 (Walnut Canyon)Passage 33 (Flagstaff)
Trail SurfaceDirt singletrack Dirt singletrack
Paved (through Flagstaff proper)
Length (Mi)18.515.5
SeasonApril-October. Snow can be significant in winter.April-October. Snow can be significant in winter.
Potential Water SourcesWalnut Canyon Visitor Center
Wildlife Water Tank (217.5 SOBO, 571.2 NOBO)
Wildlife Water Tank (220.2 SOBO, 568.5 NOBO)
Flagstaff
Marshall Mesa Tank (228.2 SOBO, 560.5 NOBO)
TrailheadsNorth: I-40 at Cosnino Road
South: Marshall Lake
North: Schultz Pass
South: Fisher Point
Trailhead AccessVehicular access North: Graded dirt/gravel road
Middle: Paved roads through Flagstaff
South: Foot/bike access
WildernessNoNo
Possible resupply pointsEast Flagstaff
Flagstaff
Flagstaff
ATA-Rated DifficultyEasy Moderate (south end is easier)
Potential campsites (mileages S to N)Various LNT-compatible points throughout; terrain is not a limitation here. However, camping is not allowed on the west end below Fisher Point or within Walnut Canyon National Monument.N/A
Ecosystems TraversedRocky Mountain Montane Conifer WoodlandRocky Mountain Montane Conifer Woodland
Sites of InterestWalnut Canyon National Monument
Fisher Point
Historic Flagstaff
Sources: Personal experience, Guthook Guides, ATA Guide to the Arizona Trail
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Rocky Mountain Montane Conifer Woodland
Common Trees/Shrubs* Ponderosa Pine
* Southwestern white pine
* Subalpine fir
* White fir
* Rocky Mountain maple
* Bigtooth maple
* Grey alder
* Red birch
* Red osier dogwood
* Cliffbush
* Mallow ninebark
* New Mexican locust
* huckleberry
* bilberries



Common herbaceous plants* fringed brome
* Geyer’s sedge/elk sedge
* Ross’ sedge
* Bronze sedge/dry land sedge/hillside sedge/hay sedge/Fernald’s hay sedge
* screwleaf muhly
* bluebunch wheatgrass
* Spruce-fir fleabane
* wild strawberry/Virginia strawberry
* Small-flowered woodrush
* mountain sweet Cicely
* bittercress ragwort
* western meadow-rue
* Fendler’s meadow-rue
Common succulents
Passage 23 & 22 Ecology (source: Arizona Trail Association AZT Guide & NatureServe). Only California and Texas are more diverse ecologically than Arizona.
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