Arizona Trail, Day 18: Passage 35, Babbitt Ranch (Trans-Arizona/Utah Hike Day 24)

In the land of Arizona
Through desert heat or snow
Winds a trail for folks to follow
From Utah to Old Mexico

It’s the Arizona Trail
A pathway through the great Southwest
A diverse track through wood and stone
Your spirit it will test

Oh, sure you’ll sweat and blister
You’ll feel the miles every day
You’ll shiver at the loneliness
Your feet and seat will pay

But you’ll see moonlight on the borderlands
You’ll see stars on the Mogollon
You’ll feel the warmth of winter sun
And be thrilled straight through to bone

The aches and pains will fade away
You’ll feel renewed and whole
You’ll never be the same again
With Arizona in your soul

Along the Arizona Trail
A reverence and peace you’ll know
Through deserts, canyons, and mountains
From Utah to Old Mexico

“The Arizona Trail,” Dale R Shewalter

Well, I’ve officially found my least favorite part of the trail so far. The first 5 miles today from Moqui Stage Station to the border of the Kaibab National Forest are nice…and then the views disappear and a long roadwalk down a valley begins where one crosses into the Babbit Ranch Passage (Passage 35). The views disappear until after Upper Lockwood Tank. From there it gets marginally better with nice views of the Peaks returning, but with a full moon I choose to hike a few extra hours at night to cut down on tomorrow’s distance on this passage. I meet Coyote, another sobo thru-hiker, on the trail twice today, first just after breakfast and again and he tells me about seeing some coyotes and a mountain lion fight over an elk that he saw that morning. Very cool wildlife encounter, maybe I’ll get to see something like that?

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The Arizona Trail heads through the pinyon-juniper forest of the Coconino Plateau
AZT Passage 35, Babbitt Ranch
Kaibab National Forest
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The Arizona Trail heads through the pinyon-juniper forest of the Coconino Plateau
AZT Passage 35, Babbitt Ranch
Kaibab National Forest
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The San Francisco Peaks rise above the pinyon-juniper woodland of the Coconino Plateau
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
Kaibab National Forest
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The San Francisco Peaks rise above the pinyon-juniper woodland of the Coconino Plateau
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
Kaibab National Forest
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Juniper beside the Arizona Trail
AZT Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
Kaibab National Forest
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The Arizona Trail exits the Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail Passage 35, Babbitt Ranch.
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Entering Babbitt Ranch after exiting the Kaibab National Forest
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)

Water along this stretch of trail is pretty limited. There was a cache at Moqui Stage Station and a tank that is open to hikers to use at Tub Ranch. Other than that, its hot, dry, and exposed. The only access point passed today was Moqui Stage Station off FR-301 at the start.

Section Details:

Water SourcesMoqui Stage Station (potential caches, no natural source)
Tub Ranch water tank
TrailheadMoqui Stage Station (accessed via FR-301 in the Kaibab National Forest)
Section details for today’s stretch of trail as hiked
Length24.5 miles
Water SourcesMoqui Stage Station (potential caches, no natural source)
Tub Ranch water tank
Cedar Ranch (supply box)
TrailheadMoqui Stage Station (accessed via FR-301 in the Kaibab National Forest)
Cedar Ranch
Full passage details
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The Arizona Trail passes through rabbitbrush meadows heading south
AZT Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
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The San Francisco Peaks and San Francisco Volcanic Field rise out of the Colorado Plateau among pinyon-juniper woods and rice grass meadows. Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
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The San Francisco Peaks rise out of the Coconino Plateau among pinyon-juniper woods and rice grass meadows.
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
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Hills of the San Francisco Volcanic Field rise out of the Coconino Plateau among pinyon-juniper woods and rice grass/rabbitbrush meadows. Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch).
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The San Francisco Peaks and the hills and mountains of the San Francisco Volcanic Field rise out of the Coconino Plateau among pinyon-juniper woods and rice grass/rabbitbrush meadows.
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
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The San Francisco Peaks and the hills and mountains of the San Francisco Volcanic Field rise out of the Coconino Plateau among pinyon-juniper woods and rice grass/rabbitbrush meadows.
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch).
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The San Francisco Peaks (center) and the hills and mountains of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, such as Kendrick Peak (right), rise out of the Coconino Plateau among pinyon-juniper woods and rice grass/rabbitbrush meadows.
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch).
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The AZT curves towards the San Francisco Peaks (left) and the eastern hills and mountains of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, such as Kendrick Peak (center), rise out of the Colorado Plateau among pinyon-juniper woods and rice grass/rabbitbrush meadows.
Arizona Trail Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch).
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Full Moon Hiking
Arizona Trail, Passage 35 (Babbitt Ranch)
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National Park Quest: Tonto National Monument

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

Backpacking the Amazing Arizona Trail – Inspiration Point to Roosevelt Cemetery (Passages 20 & 19, Four Peaks to Superstition Mountains)

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

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Arizona Trail Backpacking Logistics – AZT Gateway Communities: Tonto Basin

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

Backpacking the Amazing Arizona Trail – Four Peaks South (Passage 20)

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Saddle Mountain Passage from near Saddle Mountain to Sycamore Creek at the start of the Pine Mountain passage. More magnificent Arizona mountain views of the central Mazatzal peaks and ridgelines, and a gorgeous Arizona sunset.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

Backpacking the Amazing Arizona Trail – Four Peaks North (Passage 20)

Backpacking the Arizona Trail’s Four Peaks Passage to just south of Pigeon Spring. The terrain is incredibly precipitous – in places the trail seems to occupy the only level ground around. Fire impacts are present throughout as well, a legacy of the 1996 Lone Fire. Magnificent views of Roosevelt Lake, the southern Mazatzal foothills, and the Sierra Ancha across Tonto Basin.

Logistics, trail journal, and magnificent mountain scenery.

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